15
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Potentiates Jagged 1-Mediated Angiogenesis by Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes : Angiogenesis Mediated by Jagged1 in MSC Exosomes

      , , , , ,

      STEM CELLS

      Wiley-Blackwell

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Insufficient vessel growth associated with ischemia remains an unresolved issue in vascular medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to promote angiogenesis via a mechanism that is potentiated by hypoxia. Overexpression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α in MSCs improves their therapeutic potential by inducing angiogenesis in transplanted tissues. Here, we studied the contribution of exosomes released by HIF-1α-overexpressing donor MSCs (HIF-MSC) to angiogenesis by endothelial cells. Exosome secretion was enhanced in HIF-MSC. Omics analysis of miRNAs and proteins incorporated into exosomes pointed to the Notch pathway as a candidate mediator of exosome communication. Interestingly, we found that Jagged1 was the sole Notch ligand packaged into MSC exosomes and was more abundant in HIF-MSC than in MSC controls. The addition of Jagged1-containing exosomes from MSC and HIF-MSC cultures to endothelial cells triggered transcriptional changes in Notch target genes and induced angiogenesis in an in vitro model of capillary-like tube formation, and both processes were stimulated by HIF-1α. Finally, subcutaneous injection of Jagged 1-containing exosomes from MSC and HIF-MSC cultures in the Matrigel plug assay induced angiogenesis in vivo, which was more robust when they were derived from HIF-MSC cultures. All Jagged1-mediated effects could be blocked by prior incubation of exosomes with an anti-Jagged 1 antibody. All together, the results indicate that exosomes derived from MSCs stably overexpressing HIF-1α have an increased angiogenic capacity in part via an increase in the packaging of Jagged1, which could have potential applications for the treatment of ischemia-related disease. Stem Cells 2017;35:1747-1759.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Exosome secretion: molecular mechanisms and roles in immune responses.

          Exosomes are small membrane vesicles, secreted by most cell types from multivesicular endosomes, and thought to play important roles in intercellular communications. Initially described in 1983, as specifically secreted by reticulocytes, exosomes became of interest for immunologists in 1996, when they were proposed to play a role in antigen presentation. More recently, the finding that exosomes carry genetic materials, mRNA and miRNA, has been a major breakthrough in the field, unveiling their capacity to vehicle genetic messages. It is now clear that not only immune cells but probably all cell types are able to secrete exosomes: their range of possible functions expands well beyond immunology to neurobiology, stem cell and tumor biology, and their use in clinical applications as biomarkers or as therapeutic tools is an extensive area of research. Despite intensive efforts to understand their functions, two issues remain to be solved in the future: (i) what are the physiological function(s) of exosomes in vivo and (ii) what are the relative contributions of exosomes and of other secreted membrane vesicles in these proposed functions? Here, we will focus on the current ideas on exosomes and immune responses, but also on their mechanisms of secretion and the use of this knowledge to elucidate the latter issue. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A microRNA signature of hypoxia.

            Recent research has identified critical roles for microRNAs in a large number of cellular processes, including tumorigenic transformation. While significant progress has been made towards understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation by microRNAs, much less is known about factors affecting the expression of these noncoding transcripts. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a functional link between hypoxia, a well-documented tumor microenvironment factor, and microRNA expression. Microarray-based expression profiles revealed that a specific spectrum of microRNAs (including miR-23, -24, -26, -27, -103, -107, -181, -210, and -213) is induced in response to low oxygen, at least some via a hypoxia-inducible-factor-dependent mechanism. Select members of this group (miR-26, -107, and -210) decrease proapoptotic signaling in a hypoxic environment, suggesting an impact of these transcripts on tumor formation. Interestingly, the vast majority of hypoxia-induced microRNAs are also overexpressed in a variety of human tumors.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Notch Signaling: Cell Fate Control and Signal Integration in Development

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                STEM CELLS
                Stem Cells
                Wiley-Blackwell
                10665099
                July 2017
                July 2017
                : 35
                : 7
                : 1747-1759
                Article
                10.1002/stem.2618
                28376567
                © 2017

                Comments

                Comment on this article