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      Reduced projection angles for binary tomography with particle aggregation

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          Abstract

          This paper extends particle aggregate reconstruction technique (PART), a reconstruction algorithm for binary tomography based on the movement of particles. PART supposes that pixel values are particles, and that particles diffuse through the image, staying together in regions of uniform pixel value known as aggregates. In this work, a variation of this algorithm is proposed and a focus is placed on reducing the number of projections and whether this impacts the reconstruction of images. The algorithm is tested on three phantoms of varying sizes and numbers of forward projections and compared to filtered back projection, a random search algorithm and to SART, a standard algebraic reconstruction method. It is shown that the proposed algorithm outperforms the aforementioned algorithms on small numbers of projections. This potentially makes the algorithm attractive in scenarios where collecting less projection data are inevitable.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Diffusion-Limited Aggregation, a Kinetic Critical Phenomenon

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            Algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) for three-dimensional electron microscopy and x-ray photography.

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              Electron tomography and holography in materials science.

              The rapid development of electron tomography, in particular the introduction of novel tomographic imaging modes, has led to the visualization and analysis of three-dimensional structural and chemical information from materials at the nanometre level. In addition, the phase information revealed in electron holograms allows electrostatic and magnetic potentials to be mapped quantitatively with high spatial resolution and, when combined with tomography, in three dimensions. Here we present an overview of the techniques of electron tomography and electron holography and demonstrate their capabilities with the aid of case studies that span materials science and the interface between the physical sciences and the life sciences.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                m.majid@gold.ac.uk
                t.blackwell@gold.ac.uk
                Journal
                Evol Intell
                Evol Intell
                Evolutionary Intelligence
                Springer Berlin Heidelberg (Berlin/Heidelberg )
                1864-5909
                1864-5917
                8 August 2016
                8 August 2016
                2016
                : 9
                : 3
                : 67-79
                Affiliations
                Department of Computing, Goldsmiths, University of London, London, SE14 6NW UK
                Article
                140
                10.1007/s12065-016-0140-7
                5002048
                © The Author(s) 2016

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

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                © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

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