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      Oocyte cryopreservation: where are we now?

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      Human Reproduction Update
      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          Since the first live birth from oocyte cryopreservation three decades ago, oocyte cryopreservation has become an important component of ART. Cryopreservation techniques have evolved, leading to higher success rates and the introduction of oocyte cryopreservation into IVF clinics worldwide. Concurrently, there has been an increase in patient demand, especially for so-called 'social egg freezing' that allows women to preserve their fertility in anticipation of age-related fertility decline. This review addresses a need to evaluate the current status of oocyte cryopreservation. It explores current techniques and success rates, clinical applications, the rise of elective oocyte cryopreservation, and future implications.

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          Most cited references143

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          BIRTH AFTER THE REIMPLANTATION OF A HUMAN EMBRYO

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            Maternal age and fetal loss: population based register linkage study

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              American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations on fertility preservation in cancer patients.

              To develop guidance to practicing oncologists about available fertility preservation methods and related issues in people treated for cancer. An expert panel and a writing committee were formed. The questions to be addressed by the guideline were determined, and a systematic review of the literature from 1987 to 2005 was performed, and included a search of online databases and consultation with content experts. The literature review found many cohort studies, case series, and case reports, but relatively few randomized or definitive trials examining the success and impact of fertility preservation methods in people with cancer. Fertility preservation methods are used infrequently in people with cancer. As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, oncologists should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years and be prepared to discuss possible fertility preservation options or refer appropriate and interested patients to reproductive specialists. Clinician judgment should be employed in the timing of raising this issue, but discussion at the earliest possible opportunity is encouraged. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available; other available fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and be performed in centers with the necessary expertise. Fertility preservation is often possible in people undergoing treatment for cancer. To preserve the full range of options, fertility preservation approaches should be considered as early as possible during treatment planning.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Human Reproduction Update
                Hum. Reprod. Update
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1355-4786
                1460-2369
                June 23 2016
                June 2016
                June 2016
                March 22 2016
                : 22
                : 4
                : 440-449
                Article
                10.1093/humupd/dmw007
                27006004
                96a15590-cd94-4623-8b30-d2c795607947
                © 2016
                History

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