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      “IT IS HIS IMAGE WITH PULQUE”: DRINKS, GIFTS, AND POLITICAL NETWORKING IN CLASSIC MAYA TEXTS AND IMAGES

      Ancient Mesoamerica

      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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          Abstract

          Despite a widespread notion that feasting played a major role in the workings of Classic Maya polities, the very concept of feasting in the context of its textual and visual representations remains poorly defined and understood. The present paper reviews the ancient narratives in order to present a more nuanced interpretation of the consumption and display of exquisite food and drinks at the courts of Maya lords and nobles. It also considers some tangible evidence of the sociopolitical networks created through feasting by looking at the spatial distributions of signed serving vessels which changed hands as gifts.

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          Most cited references 22

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          Like Water for Chocolate: Feasting and Political Ritual among the Late Classic Maya at Xunantunich, Belize

           Lisa LeCount (2001)
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            Sociopolitical network interactions: A case study of the Classic Maya

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              The Maize Tamale in Classic Maya Diet, Epigraphy, and Art

               Karl A. Taube (1989)
              Iconographic, epigraphic, and linguistic data provide new evidence that the tamale constituted the primary maize food of Classic Maya diet. Archaeological and ethnohistoric data pertaining to the tamale and tortilla are reviewed and discussed in terms of the widespread representation of the tamale in Classic Maya epigraphy and art. Iconographic forms of the tamale are isolated and compared with hieroglyphic signs. Glyphs T:14, 39, 86, 130, 135, 506, 507, 754, 577, 584, and 739 are identified as representations of the tamale. Affix T130 contains either of two tamale types, both possessing the phonetic value wa or wah in the ancient script. This syllable provides readings for the Postclassic water group, the action of standing, and an unusual emblem glyph possibly referring to a supernatural region. In addition, the two tamale forms of T130 provide partial readings for the Classic terms for the numbers six, eight, and the name glyph of God N. It is suggested that the tamale constituted an important offering in Classic ritual, and is a principal subject of 819-day cycle texts.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ancient Mesoamerica
                Ancient Mesoam
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                0956-5361
                1469-1787
                2016
                June 03 2016
                2016
                : 27
                : 1
                : 13-29
                Article
                10.1017/S0956536116000043
                © 2016

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