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      Fundamental Mechanisms of Regulated Cell Death and Implications for Heart Disease

      1 , 1 , 1 , 1 , 1
      Physiological Reviews
      American Physiological Society

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          Abstract

          Twelve regulated cell death programs have been described. We review in detail the basic biology of nine including death receptor-mediated apoptosis, death receptor-mediated necrosis (necroptosis), mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, mitochondrial-mediated necrosis, autophagy-dependent cell death, ferroptosis, pyroptosis, parthanatos, and immunogenic cell death. This is followed by a dissection of the roles of these cell death programs in the major cardiac syndromes: myocardial infarction and heart failure. The most important conclusion relevant to heart disease is that regulated forms of cardiomyocyte death play important roles in both myocardial infarction with reperfusion (ischemia/reperfusion) and heart failure. While a role for apoptosis in ischemia/reperfusion cannot be excluded, regulated forms of necrosis, through both death receptor and mitochondrial pathways, are critical. Ferroptosis and parthanatos are also likely important in ischemia/reperfusion, although it is unclear if these entities are functioning as independent death programs or as amplification mechanisms for necrotic cell death. Pyroptosis may also contribute to ischemia/reperfusion injury, but potentially through effects in non-cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte loss through apoptosis and necrosis is also an important component in the pathogenesis of heart failure and is mediated by both death receptor and mitochondrial signaling. Roles for immunogenic cell death in cardiac disease remain to be defined but merit study in this era of immune checkpoint cancer therapy. Biology-based approaches to inhibit cell death in the various cardiac syndromes are also discussed.

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          Most cited references335

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          The blockade of immune checkpoints in cancer immunotherapy.

          Among the most promising approaches to activating therapeutic antitumour immunity is the blockade of immune checkpoints. Immune checkpoints refer to a plethora of inhibitory pathways hardwired into the immune system that are crucial for maintaining self-tolerance and modulating the duration and amplitude of physiological immune responses in peripheral tissues in order to minimize collateral tissue damage. It is now clear that tumours co-opt certain immune-checkpoint pathways as a major mechanism of immune resistance, particularly against T cells that are specific for tumour antigens. Because many of the immune checkpoints are initiated by ligand-receptor interactions, they can be readily blocked by antibodies or modulated by recombinant forms of ligands or receptors. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) antibodies were the first of this class of immunotherapeutics to achieve US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. Preliminary clinical findings with blockers of additional immune-checkpoint proteins, such as programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), indicate broad and diverse opportunities to enhance antitumour immunity with the potential to produce durable clinical responses.
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            Chemotherapy drugs induce pyroptosis through caspase-3 cleavage of a Gasdermin

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              Induction of TNF receptor I-mediated apoptosis via two sequential signaling complexes.

              Apoptosis induced by TNF-receptor I (TNFR1) is thought to proceed via recruitment of the adaptor FADD and caspase-8 to the receptor complex. TNFR1 signaling is also known to activate the transcription factor NF-kappa B and promote survival. The mechanism by which this decision between cell death and survival is arbitrated is not clear. We report that TNFR1-induced apoptosis involves two sequential signaling complexes. The initial plasma membrane bound complex (complex I) consists of TNFR1, the adaptor TRADD, the kinase RIP1, and TRAF2 and rapidly signals activation of NF-kappa B. In a second step, TRADD and RIP1 associate with FADD and caspase-8, forming a cytoplasmic complex (complex II). When NF-kappa B is activated by complex I, complex II harbors the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP(L) and the cell survives. Thus, TNFR1-mediated-signal transduction includes a checkpoint, resulting in cell death (via complex II) in instances where the initial signal (via complex I, NF-kappa B) fails to be activated.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Physiological Reviews
                Physiological Reviews
                American Physiological Society
                0031-9333
                1522-1210
                October 01 2019
                October 01 2019
                : 99
                : 4
                : 1765-1817
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology, Wilf Family Cardiovascular Research Institute, Albert Einstein Cancer Center, and Einstein-Mount Sinai Diabetes Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York; Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey; Department of Internal Medicine 3, Division of Nephrology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden...
                Article
                10.1152/physrev.00022.2018
                6890986
                31364924
                97470356-b3f0-4325-9b5e-79f026ce6a51
                © 2019
                History

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