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      Biocorrosion of carbon steel alloys by an hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio capillatus isolated from a Mexican oil field separator

      , , , , , , , ,
      Corrosion Science
      Elsevier BV

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          Biocorrosion: towards understanding interactions between biofilms and metals.

          The term microbially influenced corrosion, or biocorrosion, refers to the accelerated deterioration of metals owing to the presence of biofilms on their surfaces. The detailed mechanisms of biocorrosion are still poorly understood. Recent investigations into biocorrosion have focused on the influence of biomineralization processes taking place on metallic surfaces and the impact of extracellular enzymes, active within the biofilm matrix, on electrochemical reactions at the biofilm-metal interface.
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            Iron corrosion by novel anaerobic microorganisms.

            Corrosion of iron presents a serious economic problem. Whereas aerobic corrosion is a chemical process, anaerobic corrosion is frequently linked to the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB are supposed to act upon iron primarily by produced hydrogen sulphide as a corrosive agent and by consumption of 'cathodic hydrogen' formed on iron in contact with water. Among SRB, Desulfovibrio species--with their capacity to consume hydrogen effectively--are conventionally regarded as the main culprits of anaerobic corrosion; however, the underlying mechanisms are complex and insufficiently understood. Here we describe novel marine, corrosive types of SRB obtained via an isolation approach with metallic iron as the only electron donor. In particular, a Desulfobacterium-like isolate reduced sulphate with metallic iron much faster than conventional hydrogen-scavenging Desulfovibrio species, suggesting that the novel surface-attached cell type obtained electrons from metallic iron in a more direct manner than via free hydrogen. Similarly, a newly isolated Methanobacterium-like archaeon produced methane with iron faster than do known hydrogen-using methanogens, again suggesting a more direct access to electrons from iron than via hydrogen consumption.
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              Anaerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons in crude oil by new types of sulphate-reducing bacteria.

              Many crude oil constituents are biodegradable in the presence of oxygen; however, a substantial anaerobic degradation has never been demonstrated. An unusually low content of n-alkanes in oils of certain deposits is commonly attributed to selective utilization of these hydrocarbons by aerobic microorganisms. On the other hand, oil wells and production fluids were shown to harbour anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria, but their actual electron donors and carbon sources were unknown. On the basis of nutritional properties of various bacterial isolates it was assumed that fatty acids and H2 are potential electron donors for sulphate reduction in situ. Here we demonstrate that hydrocarbons in crude oil are used directly by sulphate-reducing bacteria growing under strictly anoxic conditions. A moderately thermophilic pure culture selectively utilizes n-alkanes in oil for sulphate reduction to sulphide. In addition, a mesophilic sulphate-reducing enrichment culture is shown to oxidize alkylbenzenes in oil. Thus, sulphate-reducing bacteria utilizing aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons as electron donors may present a significant source of sulphide in oil deposits and oil production plants.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Corrosion Science
                Corrosion Science
                Elsevier BV
                0010938X
                September 2006
                September 2006
                : 48
                : 9
                : 2417-2431
                Article
                10.1016/j.corsci.2005.09.005
                983e9772-fcd3-4cc1-b594-e414cebf4612
                © 2006

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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