Blog
About

5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      White Matter Connectivity Reflects Success in Musical Improvisation

      Preprint

      , , , ,

      bioRxiv

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Creativity is the ability to produce work that is novel, high in quality, and appropriate to an audience. One domain of creativity comes from musical improvisation, in which individuals spontaneously create novel auditory-motor sequences that are aesthetically rewarding. Here we test the hypothesis that individual differences in creative behavior are subserved by mesial and lateral differences in white matter connectivity. We compare jazz improvising musicians against classical (non-improvising) musicians and non-musician control subjects in musical performance and diffusion tensor imaging. Subjects improvised on short musical motifs and underwent DTI. Statistical measures of fluency and entropy for musical performances predicted expert ratings of creativity for each performance. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) showed higher Fractional Anisotropy (FA) in the cingulate cortex and corpus callosum in jazz musicians. FA in the cingulate also correlated with entropy. Probabilistic tractography from these mesial regions to lateral seed regions of the arcuate fasciculus, a pathway known to be involved in sound perception and production, showed mesial-to-lateral connectivity that correlated with improvisation training. Results suggest that white matter connectivity between lateral and mesial structures may integrate domain-general and domain-specific components of creativity.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          bioRxiv
          November 11 2017
          Article
          10.1101/218024
          © 2017
          Product

          Molecular medicine, Neurosciences

          Comments

          Comment on this article