Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Dry-season length and runoff control annual variability in stream DOC dynamics in a small, shallow groundwater-dominated agricultural watershed : SEASONAL HYDROCLIMATIC CONTROLS OF STREAM DOC DYNAMICS

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 57

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Natural Evaporation from Open Water, Bare Soil and Grass

           H. L. Penman (1948)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Dissolved organic carbon trends resulting from changes in atmospheric deposition chemistry.

            Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain recent, widespread increases in concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the surface waters of glaciated landscapes across eastern North America and northern and central Europe. Some invoke anthropogenic forcing through mechanisms related to climate change, nitrogen deposition or changes in land use, and by implication suggest that current concentrations and fluxes are without precedent. All of these hypotheses imply that DOC levels will continue to rise, with unpredictable consequences for the global carbon cycle. Alternatively, it has been proposed that DOC concentrations are returning toward pre-industrial levels as a result of a gradual decline in the sulphate content of atmospheric deposition. Here we show, through the assessment of time series data from 522 remote lakes and streams in North America and northern Europe, that rising trends in DOC between 1990 and 2004 can be concisely explained by a simple model based solely on changes in deposition chemistry and catchment acid-sensitivity. We demonstrate that DOC concentrations have increased in proportion to the rates at which atmospherically deposited anthropogenic sulphur and sea salt have declined. We conclude that acid deposition to these ecosystems has been partially buffered by changes in organic acidity and that the rise in DOC is integral to recovery from acidification. Over recent decades, deposition-driven increases in organic matter solubility may have increased the export of DOC to the oceans, a potentially important component of regional carbon balances. The increase in DOC concentrations in these regions appears unrelated to other climatic factors.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Nutrient sources, composition, and consequences

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Water Resources Research
                Water Resour. Res.
                Wiley
                00431397
                October 2015
                October 2015
                October 03 2015
                : 51
                : 10
                : 7860-7877
                Affiliations
                [1 ]INRA, UMR1069 Sol Agro et hydrosystème Spatialisation; Rennes France
                [2 ]Agrocampus Ouest, UMR1069; Rennes France
                [3 ]Université européenne de Bretagne; Bretagne France
                [4 ]OSUR, UMR 6118 Géosciences Rennes, Campus de Beaulieu; Rennes France
                Article
                10.1002/2015WR017336
                © 2015

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                Comments

                Comment on this article