22
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      A meta-barcoding census of freshwater planktonic protists in Appalachia – Natural Tunnel State Park, Virginia, USA

      , , ,

      Metabarcoding and Metagenomics

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The purpose of our study was to survey the freshwater planktonic protists within an inland natural preserve in the Ridge and Valley physiographic province of the Appalachian Region using metabarcoding. Microbial eukaryotes are essential primary producers and predators in small freshwater ecosystems, yet they are often overlooked due to the difficulty of identification. This has been remedied, in part, by the cost reduction of high throughput DNA sequencing and the growth of barcode databases, making the identification and analysis of microorganisms by way of metabarcoding surveys in complex ecosystems increasingly feasible. Water samples were collected from five sites at the Natural Tunnel State Park in Scott County, VA (USA), representing three common bodies of water found in this region. Samples were initially collected during a Bioblitz event in April 2016 and then seven and fourteen weeks afterwards. Metabarcode analysis of the 23S and 18S genes identified 3663 OTUs representing 213 family level and 332 genus level taxa. This study provides an initial barcode census within a region that has a reputation as a temperate biodiversity “hotspot”. The overall protist diversity was comparably high to other temperate systems, but not unusually high; the microalgal diversity, however, was higher than that reported for other temperate regions. The three types of water bodies had their own distinctive protist biomes despite close proximity.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 45

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The global abundance and size distribution of lakes, ponds, and impoundments

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A Consumer's Guide to Evenness Indices

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Unexpected diversity of small eukaryotes in deep-sea Antarctic plankton.

              Phylogenetic information from ribosomal RNA genes directly amplified from the environment changed our view of the biosphere, revealing an extraordinary diversity of previously undetected prokaryotic lineages. Using ribosomal RNA genes from marine picoplankton, several new groups of bacteria and archaea have been identified, some of which are abundant. Little is known, however, about the diversity of the smallest planktonic eukaryotes, and available information in general concerns the phytoplankton of the euphotic region. Here we recover eukaryotes in the size fraction 0.2-5 microm from the aphotic zone (250-3,000 m deep) in the Antarctic polar front. The most diverse and relatively abundant were two new groups of alveolate sequences, related to dinoflagellates that are found at all studied depths. These may be important components of the microbial community in the deep ocean. Their phylogenetic position suggests a radiation early in the evolution of alveolates.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Metabarcoding and Metagenomics
                MBMG
                Pensoft Publishers
                2534-9708
                October 10 2018
                October 10 2018
                : 2
                Article
                10.3897/mbmg.2.26939
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article