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      Dye-sensitized solar cells based on anatase TiO2 hollow spheres/carbon nanotube composite films

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      Journal of Power Sources
      Elsevier BV

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          Light-Induced Redox Reactions in Nanocrystalline Systems

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            Solar energy conversion by dye-sensitized photovoltaic cells.

            The quality of human life depends to a large degree on the availability of energy. This is threatened unless renewable energy resources can be developed in the near future. Chemistry is expected to make important contributions to identify environmentally friendly solutions of the energy problem. One attractive strategy discussed in this Forum Article is the development of solar cells that are based on the sensitization of mesoscopic oxide films by dyes or quantum dots. These systems have already reached conversion efficiencies exceeding 11%. The underlying fundamental processes of light harvesting by the sensitizer, heterogeneous electron transfer from the electronically excited chromophore into the conduction band of the semiconductor oxide, and percolative migration of the injected electrons through the mesoporous film to the collector electrode will be described below in detail. A number of research topics will also be discussed, and the examples for the first outdoor application of such solar cells will be provided.
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              Growth of oriented single-crystalline rutile TiO(2) nanorods on transparent conducting substrates for dye-sensitized solar cells.

              Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made from oriented, one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures such as nanorods, nanowires, and nanotubes are receiving attention because direct connection of the point of photogeneration with the collection electrode using such structures may improve the cell performance. Specifically, oriented single-crystalline TiO(2) nanorods or nanowires on a transparent conductive substrate would be most desirable, but achieving these structures has been limited by the availability of synthetic techniques. In this study, a facile, hydrothermal method was developed for the first time to grow oriented, single-crystalline rutile TiO(2) nanorod films on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The diameter, length, and density of the nanorods could be varied by changing the growth parameters, such as growth time, growth temperature, initial reactant concentration, acidity, and additives. The epitaxial relation between the FTO substrate and rutile TiO(2) with a small lattice mismatch plays a key role in driving the nucleation and growth of the rutile TiO(2) nanorods on FTO. With TiCl(4)-treatment, a light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 3% could be achieved by using 4 mum-long TiO(2) nanorod films as the photoanode in a DSSC.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Power Sources
                Journal of Power Sources
                Elsevier BV
                03787753
                September 2011
                September 2011
                : 196
                : 18
                : 7891-7898
                Article
                10.1016/j.jpowsour.2011.05.014
                98c757de-7511-4264-bc34-8a88e8f9d163
                © 2011

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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