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      CRISPR-Cas systems for editing, regulating and targeting genomes.

      1 , 1

      Nature biotechnology

      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          Targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases has rapidly gone from being a niche technology to a mainstream method used by many biological researchers. This widespread adoption has been largely fueled by the emergence of the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) technology, an important new approach for generating RNA-guided nucleases, such as Cas9, with customizable specificities. Genome editing mediated by these nucleases has been used to rapidly, easily and efficiently modify endogenous genes in a wide variety of biomedically important cell types and in organisms that have traditionally been challenging to manipulate genetically. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression or label specific genomic loci in living cells. Although the genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 systems remain to be fully defined, the power of these systems to perform targeted, highly efficient alterations of genome sequence and gene expression will undoubtedly transform biological research and spur the development of novel molecular therapeutics for human disease.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nat. Biotechnol.
          Nature biotechnology
          Springer Nature
          1546-1696
          1087-0156
          Apr 2014
          : 32
          : 4
          Affiliations
          [1 ] 1] Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
          Article
          nbt.2842 NIHMS581755
          10.1038/nbt.2842
          4022601
          24584096

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