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      The timing and pattern of biotic recovery following the end-Permian mass extinction

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      Nature Geoscience

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Most cited references 89

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          Large igneous provinces and mass extinctions

           P.B. Wignall (2001)
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            Phanerozoic trends in the global diversity of marine invertebrates.

            It has previously been thought that there was a steep Cretaceous and Cenozoic radiation of marine invertebrates. This pattern can be replicated with a new data set of fossil occurrences representing 3.5 million specimens, but only when older analytical protocols are used. Moreover, analyses that employ sampling standardization and more robust counting methods show a modest rise in diversity with no clear trend after the mid-Cretaceous. Globally, locally, and at both high and low latitudes, diversity was less than twice as high in the Neogene as in the mid-Paleozoic. The ratio of global to local richness has changed little, and a latitudinal diversity gradient was present in the early Paleozoic.
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              Adaptive radiation: contrasting theory with data.

              Biologists have long been fascinated by the exceptionally high diversity displayed by some evolutionary groups. Adaptive radiation in such clades is not only spectacular, but is also an extremely complex process influenced by a variety of ecological, genetic, and developmental factors and strongly dependent on historical contingencies. Using modeling approaches, we identify 10 general patterns concerning the temporal, spatial, and genetic/morphological properties of adaptive radiation. Some of these are strongly supported by empirical work, whereas for others, empirical support is more tentative. In almost all cases, more data are needed. Future progress in our understanding of adaptive radiation will be most successful if theoretical and empirical approaches are integrated, as has happened in other areas of evolutionary biology.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Geoscience
                Nature Geosci
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1752-0894
                1752-0908
                June 2012
                May 27 2012
                June 2012
                : 5
                : 6
                : 375-383
                Article
                10.1038/ngeo1475
                © 2012

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