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      Design, synthesis and evaluation of VEGF-siRNA/CRS as a novel vector for gene delivery

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          Abstract

          Small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is a prospective method in gene therapy, but it has application limitations such as negative charge, water solubility and high molecular weight. In this study, a safe and efficient nano-vector, CRS, was designed and synthesized to facilitate siRNA delivery. Physical and chemical properties of VEGF-siRNA/CRS were characterized by methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential ( ζ) measurement, drug-releasing rate measurement, gel electrophoresis and confocal microscopy. The biological activities were evaluated using cell viability assay, gene-silencing efficacy assay in vitro, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and antitumor tests in vivo. The mean nanoparticle size of VEGF-siRNA/CRS was 121.4±0.3 nm with positive ζ potential of 7.69±4.47 mV. The release rate of VEGF-siRNA from VEGF-siRNA/CRS was 82.50% sustained for 48 h in Tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid buffer (pH 8.0). Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the efficiency of the transfection, and the result showed that VEGF mRNA expression had been knocked down by 82.36%. The expression of VEGF protein was also recorded to be downregulated to 14.83% using ELISA. The results of cytotoxicity measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that VEGF-siRNA/CRS had significant inhibitory effect on HeLa cells. The results of antitumor assays indicated that VEGF-siRNA/CRS exhibited tumor cell growth inhibition in vivo. The results demonstrated that VEGF-siRNA could be delivered and transported by the designed carrier, while siRNA could be released constantly and led to an increasing gene-silencing effect against VEGF gene. In conclusion, VEGF-siRNA/CRS is a promising carrier for siRNA delivery, and further studies are warranted.

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          Most cited references 23

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          Endosomal escape pathways for delivery of biologicals.

          Despite continuous improvements in delivery systems, the development of methods for efficient and specific delivery of targeted therapeutic agents still remains an issue in biological treatments such as protein and gene therapy. The endocytic pathway is the major uptake mechanism of cells and any biological agents, such as DNA, siRNA and proteins. These agents become entrapped in endosomes and are degraded by specific enzymes in the lysosome. Thus, a limiting step in achieving an effective biological based therapy is to facilitate the endosomal escape and ensure cytosolic delivery of the therapeutics. Bacteria and viruses are pathogens which use different mechanisms to penetrate the membranes of their target cells and escape the endosomal pathway. Different mechanisms such as pore formation in the endosomal membrane, pH-buffering effect of protonable groups and fusion into the lipid bilayer of endosomes have been proposed to facilitate the endosomal escape. Several viral and bacterial proteins have been identified that are involved in this process. In addition, chemical agents and photochemical methods to rupture the endosomal membrane have been described. New synthetic biomimetic peptides and polymers with high efficacy in facilitating the endosomal escape, low pathogenicity and toxicity have been developed. Each strategy has different characteristics and challenges for designing the best agents and techniques to facilitate the endosomal escape are ongoing. In this review, several mechanisms and agents which are involved in endosomal escape are introduced. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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            Nanoparticle-based combination therapy toward overcoming drug resistance in cancer.

            The use of multiple therapeutic agents in combination has become the primary strategy to treat drug resistant cancers. However, administration of combinatorial regimens is limited by the varying pharmacokinetics of different drugs, which results in inconsistent drug uptake and suboptimal drug combination at the tumor sites. Conventional combination strategies in aim to maximize therapeutic efficacy based on maximum tolerated dose does not account for the therapeutic synergism that is sensitive to both dosing and scheduling of multiple drugs. In the present review, we will discuss the development of multidrug-loaded nanoparticles against drug resistant cancers. Nanoparticle-based combination therapy against experimental multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer models will be summarized. In addition, we will highlight the recent advances in nanoparticle-based combination strategies against clinical cancer drug resistance, including co-encapsulation of drugs with different physicochemical properties, ratiometric control over drug loading, and temporal sequencing on drug release. These emerging strategies promise novel and better tailored combinatorial regimens for clinical cancer treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Going beyond the liver: progress and challenges of targeted delivery of siRNA therapeutics.

              Therapeutic gene silencing promises significant progress in pharmacotherapy, including considerable expansion of the druggable target space and the possibility for treating orphan diseases. Technological hurdles have complicated the efficient use of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and siRNA agents suffer particularly from insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake. Intense development and evolution of delivery systems have resulted in efficient uptake predominantly in liver tissue, in which practically all nanoparticulate and liposomal delivery systems show the highest accumulation. The most efficacious strategies include liposomes and bioconjugations with N-acetylgalactosamine. Both are in early clinical evaluation stages for treatment of liver-associated diseases. Approaches for achieving knockdown in other tissues and tumors have been proven to be more complicated. Selective targeting to tumors may be enabled through careful modulation of physical properties, such as particle size, or by taking advantage of specific targeting ligands. Significant barriers stand between sufficient accumulation in other organs, including endothelial barriers, cellular membranes, and the endosome. The brain, which is shielded by the blood-brain barrier, is of particular interest to facilitate efficient oligonucleotide therapy of neurological diseases. Transcytosis of the blood-brain barrier through receptor-specific docking is investigated to increase accumulation in the central nervous system. In this review, the current clinical status of siRNA therapeutics is summarized, as well as innovative and promising preclinical concepts employing tissue- and tumor-targeted ligands. The requirements and the respective advantages and drawbacks of bioconjugates and ligand-decorated lipid or polymeric particles are discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2016
                24 November 2016
                : 10
                : 3851-3865
                Affiliations
                School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Chunying Cui, School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Number 10 Xitoutiao, Youanmenwai, Beijing 100069, China, Tel +86 10 8391 1668, Fax +86 10 8391 1533, Email ccy@ 123456ccmu.edu.cn
                Article
                dddt-10-3851
                10.2147/DDDT.S118461
                5125806
                © 2016 Zhao et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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