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      Predicting the Functions of Long Noncoding RNAs Using RNA-Seq Based on Bayesian Network

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          Abstract

          Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play key roles in various biological processes. However, functions of most lncRNAs are poorly characterized. Here, we represent a framework to predict functions of lncRNAs through construction of a regulatory network between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes. Using RNA-seq data, the transcript profiles of lncRNAs and protein-coding genes are constructed. Using the Bayesian network method, a regulatory network, which implies dependency relations between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes, was built. In combining protein interaction network, highly connected coding genes linked by a given lncRNA were subsequently used to predict functions of the lncRNA through functional enrichment. Application of our method to prostate RNA-seq data showed that 762 lncRNAs in the constructed regulatory network were assigned functions. We found that lncRNAs are involved in diverse biological processes, such as tissue development or embryo development (e.g., nervous system development and mesoderm development). By comparison with functions inferred using the neighboring gene-based method and functions determined using lncRNA knockdown experiments, our method can provide comparable predicted functions of lncRNAs. Overall, our method can be applied to emerging RNA-seq data, which will help researchers identify complex relations between lncRNAs and coding genes and reveal important functions of lncRNAs.

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          Most cited references 76

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          TopHat: discovering splice junctions with RNA-Seq

          Motivation: A new protocol for sequencing the messenger RNA in a cell, known as RNA-Seq, generates millions of short sequence fragments in a single run. These fragments, or ‘reads’, can be used to measure levels of gene expression and to identify novel splice variants of genes. However, current software for aligning RNA-Seq data to a genome relies on known splice junctions and cannot identify novel ones. TopHat is an efficient read-mapping algorithm designed to align reads from an RNA-Seq experiment to a reference genome without relying on known splice sites. Results: We mapped the RNA-Seq reads from a recent mammalian RNA-Seq experiment and recovered more than 72% of the splice junctions reported by the annotation-based software from that study, along with nearly 20 000 previously unreported junctions. The TopHat pipeline is much faster than previous systems, mapping nearly 2.2 million reads per CPU hour, which is sufficient to process an entire RNA-Seq experiment in less than a day on a standard desktop computer. We describe several challenges unique to ab initio splice site discovery from RNA-Seq reads that will require further algorithm development. Availability: TopHat is free, open-source software available from http://tophat.cbcb.umd.edu Contact: cole@cs.umd.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
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            Mapping and quantifying mammalian transcriptomes by RNA-Seq.

            We have mapped and quantified mouse transcriptomes by deeply sequencing them and recording how frequently each gene is represented in the sequence sample (RNA-Seq). This provides a digital measure of the presence and prevalence of transcripts from known and previously unknown genes. We report reference measurements composed of 41-52 million mapped 25-base-pair reads for poly(A)-selected RNA from adult mouse brain, liver and skeletal muscle tissues. We used RNA standards to quantify transcript prevalence and to test the linear range of transcript detection, which spanned five orders of magnitude. Although >90% of uniquely mapped reads fell within known exons, the remaining data suggest new and revised gene models, including changed or additional promoters, exons and 3' untranscribed regions, as well as new candidate microRNA precursors. RNA splice events, which are not readily measured by standard gene expression microarray or serial analysis of gene expression methods, were detected directly by mapping splice-crossing sequence reads. We observed 1.45 x 10(5) distinct splices, and alternative splices were prominent, with 3,500 different genes expressing one or more alternate internal splices.
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              Transcript assembly and abundance estimation from RNA-Seq reveals thousands of new transcripts and switching among isoforms

              High-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) holds the promise of simultaneous transcript discovery and abundance estimation 1-3 . We introduce an algorithm for transcript assembly coupled with a statistical model for RNA-Seq experiments that produces estimates of abundances. Our algorithms are implemented in an open source software program called Cufflinks. To test Cufflinks, we sequenced and analyzed more than 430 million paired 75bp RNA-Seq reads from a mouse myoblast cell line representing a differentiation time series. We detected 13,692 known transcripts and 3,724 previously unannotated ones, 62% of which are supported by independent expression data or by homologous genes in other species. Analysis of transcript expression over the time series revealed complete switches in the dominant transcription start site (TSS) or splice-isoform in 330 genes, along with more subtle shifts in a further 1,304 genes. These dynamics suggest substantial regulatory flexibility and complexity in this well-studied model of muscle development.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biomed Res Int
                Biomed Res Int
                BMRI
                BioMed Research International
                Hindawi Publishing Corporation
                2314-6133
                2314-6141
                2015
                28 February 2015
                : 2015
                Affiliations
                1College of Bioinformatics Science and Technology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086, China
                2Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Medicine Research, Harbin Medical University, Ministry of Education, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086, China
                Author notes

                Academic Editor: Tatsuya Akutsu

                Article
                10.1155/2015/839590
                4359839
                Copyright © 2015 Yun Xiao et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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                Research Article

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