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      Survey of traditional Dai medicine reveals species confusion and potential safety concerns: a case study on Radix Clerodendri Japonicum

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          Abstract

          The adulteration of herbal products is a threat to consumer safety. In the present study, we surveyed the species composition of commercial Radix Clerodendri Japonicum products using DNA barcoding as a supervisory method. A reference database for plant-material DNA-barcode was successfully constructed with 48 voucher samples from 12 Clerodendrum species. The database was used to identify 27 Radix Clerodendri Japonicum decoction piece samples purchased from drug stores and hospitals. The DNA sequencing results revealed that only 1 decoction piece (3.70%) was authentic C. japonicum, as recorded in the Dai Pharmacopeia, whereas the other samples were all adulterants, indicating a potential safety issue. The results indicate that decoction pieces that are available in the market have complex origins and that DNA barcoding is a suitable tool for regulation of Dai medicines.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          CJNM
          Chinese Journal of Natural Medicines
          Elsevier
          1875-5364
          20 June 2017
          : 15
          : 6
          : 417-426
          Affiliations
          1College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, Wuhan 430065, China
          2Institute of Chinese Materia Medica, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
          3College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dali University, Dali 671000, China
          4Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100193, China
          Author notes
          *Corresponding author: CHEN Shi-Lin, Tel/Fax: 86-10-84084107, E-mail: slchen@ 123456icmm.ac.cn ; LI Xi-Wen, xwli@ 123456icmm.ac.cn

          All the authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

          Article
          S1875-5364(17)30063-8
          10.1016/S1875-5364(17)30063-8
          Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
          Funding
          Funded by: National Natural Science Foundation of China
          Award ID: 31460084
          Funded by: training scheme of reserve talents for young and middle-aged academic and technical leaders of Yunnan province
          Award ID: 2015HB058
          This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31460084), and training scheme of reserve talents for young and middle-aged academic and technical leaders of Yunnan province (Grant 2015HB058).

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