0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Becoming bovine: Mechanics and metamorphosis in Hokkaido's animal-human-machine

      research-article
      Journal of Rural Studies
      Elsevier Ltd.
      Dairy, Hokkaido, Bio-politics, Technology, Affect, HAS (Human Animal Studies)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The fieldwork for my doctoral degree was carried out over nineteen months, a year of which was spent working on an industrial dairy farm in Hokkaido, Japan's northernmost Island. As in much of the industrialised world, dairy farming in Japan is rapidly changing. Many farmers are forced by neo-liberal agricultural policies to shift from small family operated farms to high-tech, high-speed, and high overhead industrial operations. This paper focuses on the history of dairy farming in the Tokachi region; more specifically one farm and the shift over a generation to a rotary parlour milking system. It addresses the linkages this mode of production has cultivated amongst humans, dairy cows and industrialized space.

          The parlour system at Great Hopes Farm allows five workers (aided by three more stall staff) to milk over 1000 cows, fifty at a time, three times a day. The impetus behind moving to parlour technology is that it increases productivity through mechanically enhanced observation and control. However this recent mechanical separation of human and cow during the milking process has led to affectively shared interspecies and inter-human alienation. The technology of the parlour system sets daily rhythms for bovine and human alike, and separates both from a process formerly dependent upon, specialized knowledge, affective empathy, and embodied knowledge. Human and bovine experience the systemic violence of the machine and what remains is a complex bio-politics of interspecies affect and the separation of “bare” and “political” life.

          Related collections

          Most cited references11

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          How dogs dream: Amazonian natures and the politics of transspecies engagement

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Subjecting cows to robots: farming technologies and the making of animal subjects

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Dairy Cows: Workers in the Shadows?

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                J Rural Stud
                J Rural Stud
                Journal of Rural Studies
                Elsevier Ltd.
                0743-0167
                0743-0167
                14 March 2013
                January 2014
                14 March 2013
                : 33
                : 119-130
                Affiliations
                University of Tsukuba, Department of Anthropology, Folklore and History, Tsukuba, Japan
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author. Tel.: +81 (0)29 853 4506. hansen.paul.gp@ 123456u.tsukuba.ac.jp
                Article
                S0743-0167(13)00010-7
                10.1016/j.jrurstud.2013.02.001
                7127193
                999b8b8a-b297-4a23-ac0c-dc9fdc17dbf5
                Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

                Categories
                Article

                dairy,hokkaido,bio-politics,technology,affect,has (human animal studies)

                Comments

                Comment on this article