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      The prostaglandin transporter (PGT) as a potential mediator of ovulation

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          Abstract

          Prostaglandins (PGs) play an important role in the ovulatory process. However, the role of the PG transporter (PGT) in this context remains unknown. We report that the expression of PGT, a transmembrane PG carrier protein, is markedly up-regulated in preovulatory human granulosa cells (GCs). Treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), an ovulatory trigger, significantly increases the expression of PGT mRNA and protein in human GCs both in vivo and in vitro. The hCG-induced increase in the expression of PGT in cultured human GCs is mediated via protein kinase A and protein kinase C by way of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. PGT in cultured human GCs mediates the uptake of PGE2, thereby regulating its extracellular concentration. In vivo treatment of mice with PGT inhibitors effectively blocks ovulation and markedly attenuates the expression of key ovulatory genes. We hypothesize that the inhibition of PGT activity in GCs increases the extracellular concentration of PGE2, the ability of which to exert its ovulatory effect is compromised by desensitization of its cognate receptors. Together, these findings support the idea that PGT is an important mediator of ovulation and that its inhibitors may be viewed as potential candidates for nonhormonal contraception. These findings may also fill the gap in the understanding of PGT signaling, enhance the understanding of ovulatory disorders, and facilitate the treatment of infertility or subfertility in women by using nonsteroidal PG-based therapeutic approaches.

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          Most cited references 50

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          EGF-like growth factors as mediators of LH action in the ovulatory follicle.

           Mark Law,  Nam Park,  Lu Su (2004)
          Before ovulation in mammals, a cascade of events resembling an inflammatory and/or tissue remodeling process is triggered by luteinizing hormone (LH) in the ovarian follicle. Many LH effects, however, are thought to be indirect because of the restricted expression of its receptor. Here, we demonstrate that LH stimulation induces the transient and sequential expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family members amphiregulin, epiregulin, and beta-cellulin. Incubation of follicles with these growth factors recapitulates the morphological and biochemical events triggered by LH, including cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation. Thus, these EGF-related growth factors are paracrine mediators that propagate the LH signal throughout the follicle.
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            MAPK3/1 (ERK1/2) in ovarian granulosa cells are essential for female fertility.

            A surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gland triggers ovulation, oocyte maturation, and luteinization for successful reproduction in mammals. Because the signaling molecules RAS and ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2) are activated by an LH surge in granulosa cells of preovulatory follicles, we disrupted Erk1/2 in mouse granulosa cells and provide in vivo evidence that these kinases are necessary for LH-induced oocyte resumption of meiosis, ovulation, and luteinization. In addition, biochemical analyses and selected disruption of the Cebpb gene in granulosa cells demonstrate that C/EBPbeta (CCAAT/Enhancer-binding protein-beta) is a critical downstream mediator of ERK1/2 activation. Thus, ERK1/2 and C/EBPbeta constitute an in vivo LH-regulated signaling pathway that controls ovulation- and luteinization-related events.
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              Prostaglandin synthase 1 gene disruption in mice reduces arachidonic acid-induced inflammation and indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration.

              Cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2) are key enzymes in prostaglandin biosynthesis and the target enzymes for the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To study the physiological roles of the individual isoforms, we have disrupted the mouse Ptgs1 gene encoding COX-1. Homozygous Ptgs1 mutant mice survive well, have no gastric pathology, and show less indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration than wild-type mice, even though their gastric prostaglandin E2 levels are about 1% of wild type. The homozygous mutant mice have reduced platelet aggregation and a decreased inflammatory response to arachidonic acid, but not to tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate. Ptgs1 homozygous mutant females mated to homozygous mutant males produce few live offspring. COX-1-deficient mice provide a useful model to distinguish the physiological roles of COX-1 and COX-2.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Science Translational Medicine
                Sci. Transl. Med.
                American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
                1946-6234
                1946-6242
                May 11 2016
                May 11 2016
                May 11 2016
                May 11 2016
                : 8
                : 338
                : 338ra68
                Article
                10.1126/scitranslmed.aad2709
                27169804
                99ebc603-3397-45d7-b5a9-bffe31043547
                © 2016

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