2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Role of Ural blocking in Arctic sea ice loss and its connection with Arctic warming in winter

      ,
      Climate Dynamics
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Ural blocking (UB) is suggested as one of the contributors to winter sea ice loss in the Barents–Kara Seas (BKS). This study compares UB with Arctic warming (AW) in order to delineate the role of UB on winter sea ice loss and its potential link with AW. A detailed comparison reveals that UB and AW are partly linked on sub-seasonal scales via a two-way interaction; circulation produced by AW affects UB and advection induced by UB affects temperature in AW. On the other hand, the long-term impacts of AW and UB on the sea ice concentration in the BKS are distinct. In AW, strong turbulent flux from the sea surface warms the lower troposphere, increases downward longwave radiation, and broadens the open sea surface. This feedback process explains the substantial sea ice reduction observed in the BKS in association with long-term accelerating trend. Patterns of turbulent flux, net evaporation, and net longwave radiation at surface associated with UB are of opposite signs to those associated with AW, which implies that moisture and heat flux is suppressed as warm and moist air is advected from mid-latitudes. As a result, vertical feedback process is hindered under UB. The qualitative and quantitative differences arise in terms of their impacts on sea ice concentrations in the BKS, because strong turbulent flux from the open sea surface is a main driving force in AW whereas heat and moisture advection is a main forcing in UB.

          Related collections

          Most cited references46

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The ERA-Interim reanalysis: configuration and performance of the data assimilation system

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The central role of diminishing sea ice in recent Arctic temperature amplification.

            The rise in Arctic near-surface air temperatures has been almost twice as large as the global average in recent decades-a feature known as 'Arctic amplification'. Increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases have driven Arctic and global average warming; however, the underlying causes of Arctic amplification remain uncertain. The roles of reductions in snow and sea ice cover and changes in atmospheric and oceanic circulation, cloud cover and water vapour are still matters of debate. A better understanding of the processes responsible for the recent amplified warming is essential for assessing the likelihood, and impacts, of future rapid Arctic warming and sea ice loss. Here we show that the Arctic warming is strongest at the surface during most of the year and is primarily consistent with reductions in sea ice cover. Changes in cloud cover, in contrast, have not contributed strongly to recent warming. Increases in atmospheric water vapour content, partly in response to reduced sea ice cover, may have enhanced warming in the lower part of the atmosphere during summer and early autumn. We conclude that diminishing sea ice has had a leading role in recent Arctic temperature amplification. The findings reinforce suggestions that strong positive ice-temperature feedbacks have emerged in the Arctic, increasing the chances of further rapid warming and sea ice loss, and will probably affect polar ecosystems, ice-sheet mass balance and human activities in the Arctic.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Evidence linking Arctic amplification to extreme weather in mid-latitudes

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Climate Dynamics
                Clim Dyn
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0930-7575
                1432-0894
                March 2021
                December 05 2020
                March 2021
                : 56
                : 5-6
                : 1571-1588
                Article
                10.1007/s00382-020-05545-3
                99f7d535-9d1a-40dd-9ba4-17874e1cdeb7
                © 2021

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article