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      A review of the major threats and challenges to global bat conservation

      1 , 2 , 3 , 1 , 4
      Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      Wiley

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="d16269607e95">Bats are an ecologically and taxonomically diverse group accounting for roughly a fifth of mammalian diversity worldwide. Many of the threats bats face (e.g., habitat loss, bushmeat hunting, and climate change) reflect the conservation challenges of our era. However, compared to other mammals and birds, we know significantly less about the population status of most bat species, which makes prioritizing and planning conservation actions challenging. Over a third of bat species assessed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) are considered threatened or data deficient, and well over half of the species have unknown or decreasing population trends. That equals 988 species, or 80% of bats assessed by IUCN, needing conservation or research attention. Delivering conservation to bat species will require sustained efforts to assess population status and trends and address data deficiencies. Successful bat conservation must integrate research and conservation to identify stressors and their solutions and to test the efficacy of actions to stabilize or increase populations. Global and regional networks that connect researchers, conservation practitioners, and local stakeholders to share knowledge, build capacity, and prioritize and coordinate research and conservation efforts, are vital to ensuring sustainable bat populations worldwide. </p>

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          How many species of mammals are there?

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            Carpe noctem: the importance of bats as bioindicators

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              Catastrophic extinctions follow deforestation in Singapore.

              The looming mass extinction of biodiversity in the humid tropics is a major concern for the future, yet most reports of extinctions in these regions are anecdotal or conjectural, with a scarcity of robust, broad-based empirical data. Here we report on local extinctions among a wide range of terrestrial and freshwater taxa from Singapore (540 km2) in relation to habitat loss exceeding 95% over 183 years. Substantial rates of documented and inferred extinctions were found, especially for forest specialists, with the greatest proportion of extinct taxa (34-87%) in butterflies, fish, birds and mammals. Observed extinctions were generally fewer, but inferred losses often higher, in vascular plants, phasmids, decapods, amphibians and reptiles (5-80%). Forest reserves comprising only 0.25% of Singapore's area now harbour over 50% of the residual native biodiversity. Extrapolations of the observed and inferred local extinction data, using a calibrated species-area model, imply that the current unprecedented rate of habitat destruction in Southeast Asia will result in the loss of 13-42% of regional populations over the next century, at least half of which will represent global species extinctions.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
                Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci.
                Wiley
                0077-8923
                1749-6632
                April 02 2019
                April 02 2019
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Bat Conservation International Austin Texas
                [2 ]Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of California Santa Cruz Santa Cruz California
                [3 ]Department of Biological ScienceTexas Tech University Lubbock Texas
                [4 ]School of Biological SciencesUniversity of Bristol Bristol United Kingdom
                Article
                10.1111/nyas.14045
                30937915
                99fd2aee-da91-418a-bc9b-1ae8b3939be0
                © 2019

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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