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      Sclerostin monoclonal antibody enhanced bone fracture healing in an open osteotomy model in rats.

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          Abstract

          Sclerostin is a negative regulator of bone formation. Sclerostin monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) treatment promoted bone healing in various animal models. To further evaluate the healing efficiency of Scl-Ab in osteotomy healing, we investigated the time course effects of systemic administration of Scl-Ab on fracture repair in rat femoral osteotomy model. A total of 120 six-month-old male SD rats were subjected to transverse osteotomy at the right femur mid-shaft. Rats were treated with vehicle or Scl-Ab treatment for 3, 6, or 9 weeks. Fracture healing was evaluated by radiography, micro-CT, micro-CT based angiography, 4-point bending mechanical test and histological assessment. Scl-Ab treatment resulted in significantly higher total mineralized callus volume fraction, BMD and enhanced neovascularization. Histologically, Scl-Ab treatment resulted in a significant reduction in fracture callus cartilage at week 6 and increase in bone volume at week 9, associated with a greater proportion of newly formed bone area at week 6 and 9 by fluorescence microscopy. Mechanical testing showed significantly higher ultimate load in Scl-Ab treatment group at week 6 and 9. This study has demonstrated that Scl-Ab treatment enhanced bone healing in a rat femoral osteotomy model, as reflected in increased bone formation, bone mass and bone strength.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Orthop. Res.
          Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
          1554-527X
          0736-0266
          Aug 2014
          : 32
          : 8
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Lui Che Woo Institute of Innovation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
          Article
          10.1002/jor.22636
          24782158
          9a28cd4a-6725-497a-8710-70a519f52350
          © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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