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      Health education helps to relieve postembolization pain during hepatic arterial chemoembolization therapy

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          Abstract

          Aim

          Psychological intervention has been proved a complementary approach to drug analgesia. Another study suggested that health knowledge is associated with psychological symptoms in patients with liver cancer. This study is conducted to assess whether improving the health education (HE) alleviates the postembolization pain during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE).

          Materials and methods

          One hundred and fifteen patients, who required TACE for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and suffered postembolization pain, were randomized into control group (n=63) and HE group (n=52). The health knowledge was scaled with the health knowledge questionnaire (HKQ). The postembolization pain was scored using a 0–10 numeric rating scale (NRS-10) after arterial embolization in both groups.

          Results

          There were no statistical differences between male and female in all HKQ scores ( P>0.05). The HKQ scores of young people (≤45 years old) were significantly higher than those of elders (>45 years old; P<0.05). After teaching HE, the HKQ scores were significantly increased in patients of the HE group ( P<0.01). The postembolization pain score in the HE group was significantly lower than that in the control group ( P<0.05). The HKQ scores of question 1, 3, and total were negatively correlated with the pain score in this sample ( P<0.05).

          Conclusion

          Improving the HE among HCC patients before TACE is beneficial for the pain relief during interventional procedure.

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          Most cited references 28

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          Management of hepatocellular carcinoma.

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            Increased intratumoral IL-17-producing cells correlate with poor survival in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

            To characterize IL-17-producing cells, a newly defined T helper cell subset with potent pro-inflammatory properties, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to determine their prognostic values. One hundred and seventy-eight HCC patients were enrolled randomly. Distribution and phenotypic features of IL-17-producing cells were determined by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry. Compared with corresponding non-tumor regions, the levels of Th17 cells were significantly increased in tumors of HCC patients (P<0.001). Most intratumoral Th17 cells exhibited an effector memory phenotype with increased expression of CCR4 and CCR6. Intratumoral IL-17-producing cell density was associated with overall survival (OS, P=0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS, P=0.001) in HCC patients. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that intratumoral IL-17-producing cell density was an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR=2.351, P=0.009) and DFS (HR=2.256, P=0.002). Moreover, the levels of intratumoral Th17 cells were positively correlated with microvessel density in tumors (r=0.616, P=0.001). Accumulation of intratumoral IL-17-producing cells may promote tumor progression through fostering angiogenesis, and intratumoral IL-17-producing cell could serve as a potential prognostic marker and a novel therapeutic target for HCC.
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              The prevalence of depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

              Background A lot of empirical studies have been conducted to evaluate the prevalence of depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis in order to evaluate the prevalence and odds ratios of depression and anxiety in Chinese adults with cancer compared with those without. Methods The three most comprehensive computerized Chinese academic databases-CNKI, Wangfang and Vip databases-were systematically screened through September 2012. PubMed and Web of Science (SCIE) were also searched from their inception until September 2012 without language restrictions, and an internet search was also used. Case–control studies assessing the prevalence of depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer were analyzed. Study selection and appraisal were conducted independently by three authors. The non-weighted prevalence, pooled random-effects estimates of odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were all calculated. Results Seventeen eligible studies with a total of 3497 subjects were included. The prevalence of depression and anxiety were significantly higher in adults with cancer compared with those without (Depression: 54.90% vs. 17.50%, OR = 7.85, 95% CI = 5.56-11.07, P = 0.000; Anxiety: 49.69% vs. 18.37%, OR = 6.46, 95% CI = 4.36-9.55, P = 0.000), the same situation was also observed in subgroup of control groups, assessment methods and cancer types. Although no difference of depression was observed in studies utilizing clinical diagnosis compared with self-report, the OR of anxiety in adults with cancer compared with those without was higher in studies utilizing clinical diagnosis (OR = 8.42, 95% CI = 4.83-14.70) than self-reports (OR = 5.83, 95% CI = 3.64-9.34). The ORs of depression and anxiety in cancer patients compared with disease group (Depression: OR = 6.03, 95% CI = 4.23-8.61; Anxiety: OR = 4.40, 95% CI = 3.05-6.36) were lower than in those compared with normal group (Depression: OR = 13.58, 95% CI = 6.26-29.46; Anxiety: OR = 15.47, 95% CI = 10.00-23.95). Conclusions We identified high prevalence rates of depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer. The findings support that the prevalence of depression and anxiety among adults with cancer should receive more attention in Chinese medical settings.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2018
                28 September 2018
                : 11
                : 2115-2121
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Interventional Radiology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong, People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]Department of Oncology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong, People’s Republic of China, prince_room@ 123456sina.com
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Feng Ying Tao, Department of Oncology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, No.1 Jiao-Zhou Road, Qingdao, Shandong 266000, People’s Republic of China, Tel +86 532 8278 9228, Fax +86 532 8282 7158, Email prince_room@ 123456sina.com
                Article
                jpr-11-2115
                10.2147/JPR.S166333
                6169766
                © 2018 Wang et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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