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      Psychometric properties of the Chinese Internet Gaming Disorder Scale.

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          Abstract

          To develop a consensus on the definition and measurement of Internet gaming disorder (IGD), several recent studies have used the DSM-5's proposed criteria for IGD as the basis in scale construction. This study contributes to this emerging consensus by developing and validating a new Chinese Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (C-IGDS) based on the DSM-5 criteria. A representative sample of Hong Kong community adults (n=502, 50% men, mean age=37.1, age range=18-60) was recruited for a telephone survey with random digit dialing. Various statistical techniques were used to assess the psychometric properties of the C-IGDS. The C-IGDS had good reliability (Cronbach's α=0.91) and structural validity (CFA model fit: RMSEA=0.027, CFI=0.991, TLI=0.988) in our sample. Moderate to moderately strong correlations with depressive symptoms (r=0.617, p<0.001), social anxiety symptoms (r=0.366, p<0.001), and gaming hours (r=0.412, p<0.001) supported the criterion validity of the C-IGDS. In addition, the C-IGDS exhibited strict measurement invariance for sex and at least strong measurement invariance for age. In addition to providing the first Chinese scale for measuring IGD based on the DSM-5's proposed criteria, this study provides empirical support for the validity of these diagnostic criteria as the basis for a universal measure of IGD. Most important, this study is the first to reveal the criteria's measurement invariance, thereby indicating their suitability for use with diverse demographic groups.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Addict Behav
          Addictive behaviors
          Elsevier BV
          1873-6327
          0306-4603
          Nov 2017
          : 74
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong.
          [2 ] Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore, 9 Arts Link, Singapore.
          [3 ] Health Behavior Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6710B Rockledge Drive, Bethesda, MD, USA.
          [4 ] Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. Electronic address: ceci-cheng@hku.hk.
          Article
          S0306-4603(17)30209-5
          10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.05.031
          28558336

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