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      The integrin coactivator Kindlin-3 is not required for lymphocyte diapedesis

      , , , , , , ,

      Blood

      American Society of Hematology

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          Stromal cell networks regulate lymphocyte entry, migration, and territoriality in lymph nodes.

          After entry into lymph nodes (LNs), B cells migrate to follicles, whereas T cells remain in the paracortex, with each lymphocyte type showing apparently random migration within these distinct areas. Other than chemokines, the factors contributing to this spatial segregation and to the observed patterns of lymphocyte movement are poorly characterized. By combining confocal, electron, and intravital microscopy, we showed that the fibroblastic reticular cell network regulated naive T cell access to the paracortex and also supported and defined the limits of T cell movement within this domain, whereas a distinct follicular dendritic cell network similarly served as the substratum for movement of follicular B cells. These results highlight the central role of stromal microanatomy in orchestrating cell migration within the LN.
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            The tail of integrins, talin, and kindlins.

            Integrins are transmembrane cell-adhesion molecules that carry signals from the outside to the inside of the cell and vice versa. Like other cell surface receptors, integrins signal in response to ligand binding; however, events within the cell can also regulate the affinity of integrins for ligands. This feature is important in physiological situations such as those in blood, in which cells are always in close proximity to their ligands, yet cell-ligand interactions occur only after integrin activation in response to specific external cues. This review focuses on the mechanisms whereby two key proteins, talin and the kindlins, regulate integrin activation by binding the tails of integrin-beta subunits.
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              Transcriptional profiling of stroma from inflamed and resting lymph nodes defines immunological hallmarks

              Lymph node stromal cells (LNSCs) closely regulate immunity and self-tolerance, yet key aspects of their biology remain poorly illuminated. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of murine LNSC subsets revealed expression of important immune mediators, growth factors, and novel structural components. Pairwise analyses of ligands and cognate receptors across hematopoietic and stromal subsets suggested a complex web of cross-talk. Compared with skin and thymic fibroblasts, fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) were enriched in genes relevant to cytokine signaling. LNSCs from inflamed lymph nodes upregulated acute phase response genes, chemokines, and antigen presentation genes. Poorly studied podoplanin−CD31− LNSCs showed similarities to FRCs, but lacked IL-7 expression, and were identified as myofibroblastic integrin α7+ pericytes. Together these data comprehensively describe the transcriptional characteristics of LNSC subsets.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Blood
                Blood
                American Society of Hematology
                0006-4971
                1528-0020
                October 10 2013
                August 26 2013
                October 10 2013
                : 122
                : 15
                : 2609-2617
                Article
                10.1182/blood-2013-04-495036
                © 2013

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