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      Bird diversity and noteworthy records from the western side of the Porculla Pass and the Huancabamba-Chamaya river sub-basin, northwest of Peru [with Erratum] Translated title: Diversidad de aves y registros notables del lado occidental del Abra Porculla y la sub-cuenca del río Huancabamba-Chamaya, noroeste de Perú [con Errata]

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          Abstract

          Abstract Despite the great importance of the level of biodiversity and endemism that the Equatorial Seasonal Tropical dry Forest hosts, many of its areas remain unexplored. Here we present the results of the field evaluations carried out between 2014 and 2018 along the western side of the Porculla pass and the Huancabamba-Chamaya river sub-basin, in the northwest of Peru. this research is part of the dataset of the project Bird Assessments in Ecosystems of the Northwest of Peru - CINBIOTYC. We reported 170 bird taxa, belonging to 163 species and 32 families. Likewise, we reported two migratory bird species, one boreal and one austral, four endemic of Peru, and 29 restricted-range species, from which 25 belong to the Tumbesian Region, five to the Marañón Valley and one was shared between them. We highlighted the record of four trans-Andean bird taxa, Amazilia amazilia leucophoea, Euphonia saturata, Basileuterus trifasciatus, and Pyrocephalus rubinus piurae, as well as, the remarkable records of Patagioenas oenops, Pachyramphus spodiurus, Turdus maranonicus, Incaspiza ortizi, and the record of Thamnophilus bernardi at the east slope of the Andes (east of Porculla Pass).

          Translated abstract

          Resumen A pesar de la gran importancia de los niveles de biodiversidad y endemismo que el Bosque Tropical Estacionalmente Seco Ecuatorial alberga, muchas de sus áreas permanecen aún poco exploradas. Aquí se presentan los resultados de las evaluaciones de campo realizadas entre el 2014 y 2018 a lo largo del lado occidental del Abra de Porculla y la cuenca del río Huancabamba- Chamaya, noroeste de Perú. La presente investigación forma parte del proyecto de largo aliento Bird Assessments in Ecosystems of the Northwest of Peru - CINBIOTYC. Se reportó 170 taxa de aves, pertenecientes a 163 especies y 32 familias. Así mismo, se registró dos especies migratorias, una boreal y una austral, cuatro endémicas de Perú, y 29 aves de rango restringido, de los cuales 25 pertenecen a la Región Tumbesina, cinco al Valle del Marañón, y una compartida entre ellas. Resaltamos el registro trans-Andino de cuatro taxa de aves, Amazilia amazilia leucophoea, Euphonia saturata, Basileuterus trifasciatus, y Pyrocephalus rubinus piurae, así como los registros destacables de Patagioenas oenops, Pachyramphus spodiurus, Turdus maranonicus, Incaspiza ortizi, y el registro de Thamnophilus bernardi en la vertiente oriental de los Andes (este del Abra Porculla).

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          Most cited references 32

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          Observations on the Biogeography of the Amotape-Huancabamba Zone in Northern Peru

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            eBird: A citizen-based bird observation network in the biological sciences

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              Amazonia through time: Andean uplift, climate change, landscape evolution, and biodiversity.

              The Amazonian rainforest is arguably the most species-rich terrestrial ecosystem in the world, yet the timing of the origin and evolutionary causes of this diversity are a matter of debate. We review the geologic and phylogenetic evidence from Amazonia and compare it with uplift records from the Andes. This uplift and its effect on regional climate fundamentally changed the Amazonian landscape by reconfiguring drainage patterns and creating a vast influx of sediments into the basin. On this "Andean" substrate, a region-wide edaphic mosaic developed that became extremely rich in species, particularly in Western Amazonia. We show that Andean uplift was crucial for the evolution of Amazonian landscapes and ecosystems, and that current biodiversity patterns are rooted deep in the pre-Quaternary.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                arnal
                Arnaldoa
                Arnaldoa
                Universidad Privada Antenor Orrego, Museo de Historia Natural (Trujillo, , Peru )
                1815-8242
                2413-3299
                May 2020
                : 27
                : 2
                : 611-642
                Affiliations
                Piura orgnameCentro de Investigación en Biología Tropical y Conservación PERU
                Piura orgnameCentro de Investigación en Biología Tropical y Conservación PERU irwingssaldu@ 123456gmail.com
                Piura Piura orgnameUniversidad Nacional de Piura orgdiv1Escuela de Ciencias Biológicas Peru
                Rio de Janeiro orgnameUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
                Piura Piura orgnameUniversidad Nacional de Piura Peru
                Article
                S2413-32992020000200611 S2413-3299(20)02700200611
                10.22497/arnaldoa.272.27212

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

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                Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 33, Pages: 32
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