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      The journey from gene knockout to clinical medicine: telotristat and sotagliflozin

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          Abstract

          Gene knockout has been a powerful technique to evaluate the physiologic role of selected gene products. Lexicon pioneered high-throughput gene knockout technology and went further in designing agents to inhibit products of gene expression. Two agents have entered late-stage development. Telotristat is an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), preventing the production of serotonin. Although this agent blocks the two isoforms of TPH, it does not cross the blood–brain barrier, thus avoiding central neurologic manifestations. It inhibits the peripheral production of serotonin, and in particular prevents serotonin action in the intestines, resulting in decreased peristaltic action. Lexicon successfully developed telotristat to treat carcinoid syndrome not responding adequately to somatostatin inhibitors. Sotagliflozin development proceeded from the observation that dual inhibition of SGLT2 in the kidneys and SGLT1 in the intestines resulted in increased renal glucose excretion, reduced early-phase glucose absorption, as well as increased blood levels of GLP-1 and PYY. Initial development efforts focused on type 1 diabetes and have shown reduced postprandial glucose levels, less tendency to hypoglycemia, and lower HbA1c. Several other SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with increased frequency of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In the type 1 trials, sotagliflozin-treated individuals experienced DKA at a higher rate than placebo-treated patients. The sotagliflozin development program has now been extended to trials on type 2 diabetes. Long-term clinical trials will determine the benefits and risks of the agent in comparison to other currently marketed SGLT2 inhibitors.

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          Most cited references 35

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          Lanreotide in metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

          Somatostatin analogues are commonly used to treat symptoms associated with hormone hypersecretion in neuroendocrine tumors; however, data on their antitumor effects are limited. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of the somatostatin analogue lanreotide in patients with advanced, well-differentiated or moderately differentiated, nonfunctioning, somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (a tumor proliferation index [on staining for the Ki-67 antigen] of <10%) and documented disease-progression status. The tumors originated in the pancreas, midgut, or hindgut or were of unknown origin. Patients were randomly assigned to receive an extended-release aqueous-gel formulation of lanreotide (Autogel [known in the United States as Depot], Ipsen) at a dose of 120 mg (101 patients) or placebo (103 patients) once every 28 days for 96 weeks. The primary end point was progression-free survival, defined as the time to disease progression (according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.0) or death. Secondary end points included overall survival, quality of life (assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-GI.NET21), and safety. Most patients (96%) had no tumor progression in the 3 to 6 months before randomization, and 33% had hepatic tumor volumes greater than 25%. Lanreotide, as compared with placebo, was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (median not reached vs. median of 18.0 months, P<0.001 by the stratified log-rank test; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 0.73). The estimated rates of progression-free survival at 24 months were 65.1% (95% CI, 54.0 to 74.1) in the lanreotide group and 33.0% (95% CI, 23.0 to 43.3) in the placebo group. The therapeutic effect in predefined subgroups was generally consistent with that in the overall population, with the exception of small subgroups in which confidence intervals were wide. There were no significant between-group differences in quality of life or overall survival. The most common treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (in 26% of the patients in the lanreotide group and 9% of those in the placebo group). Lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (Ki-67 <10%). (Funded by Ipsen; CLARINET ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00353496; EudraCT 2005-004904-35.).
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            Synthesis of serotonin by a second tryptophan hydroxylase isoform.

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              Gene targeting in mice: functional analysis of the mammalian genome for the twenty-first century.

              Gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells has become the 'gold standard' for determining gene function in mammals. Since its inception, this technology has revolutionized the study of mammalian biology and human medicine. Here I provide a personal account of the work that led to the generation of gene targeting which now lies at the centre of functional genomic analysis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2019
                06 March 2019
                : 13
                : 817-824
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Association of Diabetes Investigators, Omaha, NE 68131, USA, rendell@ 123456asndi.com
                [2 ]Rose Salter Medical Research Foundation, Newport Coast, CA 92657, USA, rendell@ 123456asndi.com
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Marc S Rendell, Rose Salter Medical Research Foundation, 34 Versailles, Newport Coast, CA 92657, USA, Email rendell@ 123456asndi.com
                Article
                dddt-13-817
                10.2147/DDDT.S144556
                6408923
                © 2019 Rendell. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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