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      Value of Intensive Nursing Detail Management in Intensive Care Unit Nursing

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          Abstract

          Objective

          To evaluate the value of intensive nursing detail management in intensive care unit (ICU) nursing.

          Methods

          In this prospective study, 100 ICU patients in Shiyan Maternal and Child Health Hospital between January 2019 and March 2020 were assessed for eligibility and recruited. They were concurrently randomly assigned (1 : 1) to receive either conventional nursing (control group) or intensive nursing detail management (study group). The clinical endpoint was the nursing efficiency.

          Results

          Intensive nursing detail management was associated with significantly higher scores in basic nursing, quality of nursing, and quality of management versus conventional nursing ( P < 0.05). Intensive nursing detail management resulted in a significantly higher adequate nursing rate (96.00%) versus conventional nursing (74.00%) ( P < 0.05). The patients given intensive nursing detail management had a shorter hospital stay versus those receiving conventional nursing ( P < 0.05). Intensive nursing detail management was associated with a higher nursing satisfaction rate (74.00%) versus conventional nursing (70.00%) ( P < 0.05).

          Conclusion

          Intensive nursing detail management is effective and safe in ICU nursing, so it is worthy of clinical application.

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          Most cited references20

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          What is an intensive care unit? A report of the task force of the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

          Since their widespread introduction more than half a century ago, intensive care units (ICUs) have become an integral part of the health care system. Although most ICUs are found in high-income countries, they are increasingly a feature of health care systems in low- and middle-income countries. The World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine convened a task force whose objective was to answer the question "What is an ICU?" in an internationally meaningful manner and to develop a system for stratifying ICUs on the basis of the intensity of the care they provide. We undertook a scoping review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature to assemble existing models for ICU stratification. Based on these and on discussions among task force members by teleconference and 2 face-to-face meetings, we present a proposed definition and classification of ICUs. An ICU is an organized system for the provision of care to critically ill patients that provides intensive and specialized medical and nursing care, an enhanced capacity for monitoring, and multiple modalities of physiologic organ support to sustain life during a period of life-threatening organ system insufficiency. Although an ICU is based in a defined geographic area of a hospital, its activities often extend beyond the walls of the physical space to include the emergency department, hospital ward, and follow-up clinic. A level 1 ICU is capable of providing oxygen, noninvasive monitoring, and more intensive nursing care than on a ward, whereas a level 2 ICU can provide invasive monitoring and basic life support for a short period. A level 3 ICU provides a full spectrum of monitoring and life support technologies, serves as a regional resource for the care of critically ill patients, and may play an active role in developing the specialty of intensive care through research and education. A formal definition and descriptive framework for ICUs can inform health care decision-makers in planning and measuring capacity and provide clinicians and patients with a benchmark to evaluate the level of resources available for clinical care.
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            Artificial Intelligence in the Intensive Care Unit

            This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2020. Other selected articles can be found online at https://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2020. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901.
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              Intensive care medicine is 60 years old: the history and future of the intensive care unit.

              Intensive care is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year. The concept arose from the devastating Copenhagen polio epidemic of 1952, which resulted in hundreds of victims experiencing respiratory and bulbar failure. Over 300 patients required artificial ventilation for several weeks. This was provided by 1,000 medical and dental students who were employed to hand ventilate the lungs of these patients via tracheostomies. By 1953, Bjorn Ibsen, the anaesthetist who had suggested that positive pressure ventilation should be the treatment of choice during the epidemic, had set up the first intensive care unit (ICU) in Europe, gathering together physicians and physiologists to manage sick patients - many would consider him to be the 'father' of intensive care. Here, we discuss the events surrounding the 1952 polio epidemic, the subsequent development of ICUs throughout the UK, the changes that have occurred in intensive care over the past 10 years and what the future holds for the specialty.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Evid Based Complement Alternat Med
                Evid Based Complement Alternat Med
                ECAM
                Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : eCAM
                Hindawi
                1741-427X
                1741-4288
                2022
                22 June 2022
                22 June 2022
                : 2022
                : 9115639
                Affiliations
                1Nursing Department, Shiyan Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei Province, China
                2Critical Care Medicine, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei 442000, China
                3Department of Neurosurgery, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei 442000, China
                Author notes

                Academic Editor: Zhaoqi Dong

                Author information
                https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4828-2062
                Article
                10.1155/2022/9115639
                9242789
                9ac429ce-0228-413d-8073-5ed67d8037fc
                Copyright © 2022 Yansong Li et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 10 March 2022
                : 24 April 2022
                : 13 June 2022
                Categories
                Research Article

                Complementary & Alternative medicine
                Complementary & Alternative medicine

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