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      Public fear of protesters and support for protest policing: An experimental test of two theoretical models*

      1 , 2
      Criminology
      Wiley

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          Sampling Weights and Regression Analysis

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            Logistic Regression: Why We Cannot Do What We Think We Can Do, and What We Can Do About It

            C. Mood (2010)
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              Validating vignette and conjoint survey experiments against real-world behavior.

              Survey experiments, like vignette and conjoint analyses, are widely used in the social sciences to elicit stated preferences and study how humans make multidimensional choices. However, there is a paucity of research on the external validity of these methods that examines whether the determinants that explain hypothetical choices made by survey respondents match the determinants that explain what subjects actually do when making similar choices in real-world situations. This study compares results from conjoint and vignette analyses on which immigrant attributes generate support for naturalization with closely corresponding behavioral data from a natural experiment in Switzerland, where some municipalities used referendums to decide on the citizenship applications of foreign residents. Using a representative sample from the same population and the official descriptions of applicant characteristics that voters received before each referendum as a behavioral benchmark, we find that the effects of the applicant attributes estimated from the survey experiments perform remarkably well in recovering the effects of the same attributes in the behavioral benchmark. We also find important differences in the relative performances of the different designs. Overall, the paired conjoint design, where respondents evaluate two immigrants side by side, comes closest to the behavioral benchmark; on average, its estimates are within 2% percentage points of the effects in the behavioral benchmark.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Criminology
                Criminology
                Wiley
                0011-1384
                1745-9125
                October 13 2021
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of South Carolina
                [2 ]University at Albany, SUNY
                Article
                10.1111/1745-9125.12291
                9ad2abee-ea40-4136-b438-905ad1e3ef7b
                © 2021

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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