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      Role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in cancer

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          Abstract

          Inflammasomes are large intracellular multi-protein signalling complexes that are formed in the cytosolic compartment as an inflammatory immune response to endogenous danger signals. The formation of the inflammasome enables activation of an inflammatory protease caspase-1, pyroptosis initiation with the subsequent cleaving of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and proIL-18 to produce active forms. The inflammasome complex consists of a Nod-like receptor (NLR), the adapter apoptosis-associated speck-like (ASC) protein, and Caspase-1. Dysregulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation is involved tumor pathogenesis, although its role in cancer development and progression remains controversial due to the inconsistent findings described. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome on potential cancer promotion and therapy.

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          Most cited references 159

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          Hallmarks of Cancer: The Next Generation

          The hallmarks of cancer comprise six biological capabilities acquired during the multistep development of human tumors. The hallmarks constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of neoplastic disease. They include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis. Underlying these hallmarks are genome instability, which generates the genetic diversity that expedites their acquisition, and inflammation, which fosters multiple hallmark functions. Conceptual progress in the last decade has added two emerging hallmarks of potential generality to this list-reprogramming of energy metabolism and evading immune destruction. In addition to cancer cells, tumors exhibit another dimension of complexity: they contain a repertoire of recruited, ostensibly normal cells that contribute to the acquisition of hallmark traits by creating the "tumor microenvironment." Recognition of the widespread applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of new means to treat human cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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            Global cancer statistics.

            The global burden of cancer continues to increase largely because of the aging and growth of the world population alongside an increasing adoption of cancer-causing behaviors, particularly smoking, in economically developing countries. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2008 estimates, about 12.7 million cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths are estimated to have occurred in 2008; of these, 56% of the cases and 64% of the deaths occurred in the economically developing world. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females, accounting for 23% of the total cancer cases and 14% of the cancer deaths. Lung cancer is the leading cancer site in males, comprising 17% of the total new cancer cases and 23% of the total cancer deaths. Breast cancer is now also the leading cause of cancer death among females in economically developing countries, a shift from the previous decade during which the most common cause of cancer death was cervical cancer. Further, the mortality burden for lung cancer among females in developing countries is as high as the burden for cervical cancer, with each accounting for 11% of the total female cancer deaths. Although overall cancer incidence rates in the developing world are half those seen in the developed world in both sexes, the overall cancer mortality rates are generally similar. Cancer survival tends to be poorer in developing countries, most likely because of a combination of a late stage at diagnosis and limited access to timely and standard treatment. A substantial proportion of the worldwide burden of cancer could be prevented through the application of existing cancer control knowledge and by implementing programs for tobacco control, vaccination (for liver and cervical cancers), and early detection and treatment, as well as public health campaigns promoting physical activity and a healthier dietary intake. Clinicians, public health professionals, and policy makers can play an active role in accelerating the application of such interventions globally.
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              Cancer statistics, 2014.

              Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data were collected by the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. A total of 1,665,540 new cancer cases and 585,720 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States in 2014. During the most recent 5 years for which there are data (2006-2010), delay-adjusted cancer incidence rates declined slightly in men (by 0.6% per year) and were stable in women, while cancer death rates decreased by 1.8% per year in men and by 1.4% per year in women. The combined cancer death rate (deaths per 100,000 population) has been continuously declining for 2 decades, from a peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 171.8 in 2010. This 20% decline translates to the avoidance of approximately 1,340,400 cancer deaths (952,700 among men and 387,700 among women) during this time period. The magnitude of the decline in cancer death rates from 1991 to 2010 varies substantially by age, race, and sex, ranging from no decline among white women aged 80 years and older to a 55% decline among black men aged 40 years to 49 years. Notably, black men experienced the largest drop within every 10-year age group. Further progress can be accelerated by applying existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population. © 2014 American Cancer Society, Inc.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Sla2002@qatar-med.cornell.edu
                sahebkara@mums.ac.ir
                Journal
                Mol Cancer
                Mol. Cancer
                Molecular Cancer
                BioMed Central (London )
                1476-4598
                17 November 2018
                17 November 2018
                2018
                : 17
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0417 4622, GRID grid.411701.2, Student Research Committee, , Birjand University of Medical Sciences, ; Birjand, Iran
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0417 4622, GRID grid.411701.2, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, , Birjand University of Medical Sciences, ; Birjand, Iran
                [3 ]Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Education City, PO Box 24144, Doha, Qatar
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2198 6209, GRID grid.411583.a, Biotechnology Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, ; Mashhad, Iran
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2198 6209, GRID grid.411583.a, Neurogenic Inflammation Research Center, , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, ; Mashhad, Iran
                [6 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2198 6209, GRID grid.411583.a, School of Pharmacy, , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, ; Mashhad, Iran
                Article
                900
                10.1186/s12943-018-0900-3
                6240225
                30447690
                © The Author(s). 2018

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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