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      A Group Videogame-Based Physical Activity Program Improves Walking Speed in Older Adults Living With a Serious Mental Illness

      research-article
      , RN, FNP-BC, PhD , , MPH, , PhD
      , PhD, MA, CRNP, FAAN
      Innovation in Aging
      Oxford University Press
      Health disparities, Mental health, Nursing, Physical activity

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          Abstract

          Background and Objectives

          One of the most overlooked populations in our society and in health care are middle-aged and older adults living with a serious mental illness (SMI) despite the growing numbers of this population. Health care communities, including both inpatient and outpatient mental health programs, have a responsibility to provide care that nurtures clients’ mental as well as physical health needs. Providing accessible and engaging physical activity programs is an excellent way to provide this type of holistic care. The purpose of this article is to describe the impact of a pilot videogame-based physical activity program on walking speed in older adults with SMI.

          Research Design and Methods

          A one-group pretest post-test pilot study was conducted with a sample of 52 older adults with SMI recruited from community-based mental health programs. Participants played an active videogame (using the Kinect for Xbox 360 game system; Microsoft, Redmond, WA) for 50-minute group sessions 3 times a week for 10 weeks. Walking speed was assessed with the timed 3-m walk from the Short Physical Performance Battery at enrollment, 5 weeks, and 10 weeks.

          Results

          Participants achieved statistically significant improvement in walking speed (0.10 m/s, bias-corrected confidence interval Lower Limit (LL) 0.04, Upper Limit (UL) 0.15) over a 10-week period. This change represents a clinically and statistically ( p ≤ .05) significant improvement in walking speed. Best estimates for clinically meaningful changes in walking speed are 0.05 m/s for a small change and 0.10 m/s for a substantial change.

          Discussion and Implications

          Results suggest that engagement in a group videogame-based physical activity program has the potential to improve walking speed in older adults with SMI. In turn, walking speed is an important indicator of premature mortality and cardiorespiratory fitness.

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          Most cited references45

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          Missing data: our view of the state of the art.

          Statistical procedures for missing data have vastly improved, yet misconception and unsound practice still abound. The authors frame the missing-data problem, review methods, offer advice, and raise issues that remain unresolved. They clear up common misunderstandings regarding the missing at random (MAR) concept. They summarize the evidence against older procedures and, with few exceptions, discourage their use. They present, in both technical and practical language, 2 general approaches that come highly recommended: maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian multiple imputation (MI). Newer developments are discussed, including some for dealing with missing data that are not MAR. Although not yet in the mainstream, these procedures may eventually extend the ML and MI methods that currently represent the state of the art.
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              A Short Physical Performance Battery Assessing Lower Extremity Function: Association With Self-Reported Disability and Prediction of Mortality and Nursing Home Admission

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Decision Editor
                Journal
                Innov Aging
                Innov Aging
                innovateage
                Innovation in Aging
                Oxford University Press (US )
                2399-5300
                2022
                11 August 2022
                11 August 2022
                : 6
                : 6
                Affiliations
                Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California , San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
                Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California , San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
                Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California , San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
                Author notes
                Address correspondence to: Heather Leutwyler, RN, FNP-BC, PhD, 2 Koret Way, N631A, Box 0610, San Francisco, CA 94143-0610, USA. E-mail: heather.leutwyler@ 123456nursing.ucsf.edu
                Article
                igac049
                10.1093/geroni/igac049
                9701060
                36452052
                9aef2672-cc9a-4e0f-a05e-bc47338b0baf
                © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Pages: 7
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, DOI 10.13039/100006108;
                Funded by: National Institutes of Health, DOI 10.13039/100000002;
                Funded by: University of California San Francisco;
                Award ID: KL2 TR0000143
                Funded by: UCSF Clinical and Translational Science Institute;
                Award ID: KL2 TR0000143
                Funded by: Claude D. Pepper Center;
                Award ID: 4P30AG044281-04
                Funded by: Academic Senate Individual Investigator Award;
                Funded by: UCSF School of Nursing;
                Funded by: Symptom Management Faculty Scholars Program;
                Award ID: 1-P30-NR011934-0
                Funded by: National Institute on Aging, DOI 10.13039/100000049;
                Award ID: K23AG044438
                Categories
                Special Issue: Nursing Science Interventions in Aging
                Original Report
                AcademicSubjects/SOC02600

                health disparities,mental health,nursing,physical activity

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