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      Developmental consequences of antenatal dexamethasone treatment in nonhuman primates

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      Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Research assessing fetal exposure to dexamethasone and betamethasone in animals has raised concerns about the potential for adverse side effects following antenatal treatments, not withstanding the beneficial and desired improvement in lung function. Some of the inhibitory effects on physical growth and the long-term alterations in endocrine, immune and neural physiology may reflect species differences in the fetal sensitivity of rodents and monkeys to corticosteroids or perhaps could be attributed to the higher drug doses often used in animal studies. However, since steroidal drugs can be administered for extended periods in clinical practice, and also are occasionally given in the range found to cause significant effects on the brain and immune responses of infant monkeys, the simian studies have important cautionary implications for obstetrical and pediatric practice.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
          Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
          Elsevier BV
          01497634
          April 2005
          April 2005
          : 29
          : 2
          : 227-235
          Article
          10.1016/j.neubiorev.2004.10.003
          15811495
          9af24b86-d2ba-4697-b8f4-1c88ba1dce16
          © 2005

          http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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