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      Stability of Blood Eosinophil Count in Patients with COPD in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink

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          Most cited references 13

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          Blood eosinophil count and exacerbations in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroids: a post-hoc analysis of the WISDOM trial

          Blood eosinophil counts might predict response to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a history of exacerbations. We used data from the WISDOM trial to assess whether patients with COPD with higher blood eosinophil counts would be more likely to have exacerbations if ICS treatment was withdrawn.
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            Blood Eosinophils and Exacerbations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The Copenhagen General Population Study.

            Whether high blood eosinophils are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations among individuals with COPD in the general population is largely unknown.
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              Outcomes and markers in the assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

              The clinical presentation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is highly variable, reflecting the interaction of a complex range of pathological changes including both pulmonary and systemic effects. The consequences of COPD experienced by the patient (i.e. its outcomes) include: symptoms, weight loss, exercise intolerance, exacerbations, health-related quality of life, health resource use and death. No single measure can reflect the variety of pathological effects or adequately describe the nature or severity of COPD. Currently, there are few validated markers for assessing COPD and evaluating the effectiveness of treatment. The forced expiratory volume in one second has been used as a global marker of COPD, but it does not fully reflect the burden of COPD on patients. New markers are needed to better characterise the full clinical spectrum of the disease and to guide the development and assessment of new and more effective therapies. This article considers the distinction between outcomes and markers, the various ways in which markers are used and the need for new markers in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The process of marker selection and validation is reviewed and potential new biological, physiological and symptomatic markers for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are assessed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Informa UK Limited
                1541-2555
                1541-2563
                March 24 2017
                July 04 2017
                June 2017
                July 04 2017
                : 14
                : 4
                : 382-388
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Real World Evidence, GlaxoSmithKline, London, UK
                [2 ] Real World Evidence, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
                [3 ] Respiratory Medical Franchise, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, UK
                [4 ] Target Science Statistics, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, UK
                Article
                10.1080/15412555.2017.1313827
                © 2017

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