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      Catalogue of herpetological specimens of the Ewha Womans University Natural History Museum (EWNHM), Republic of Korea

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          Abstract

          The herpetology collection of the Ewha Womans University Natural History Museum ( EWNHM) represents one of the oldest and largest institutional collections in the Republic of Korea. The specimens deposited in the EWNHM represent a major historical collection of the native herpetofauna, both in species diversity and time span. However, the full inventory of the herpetology collection has never been conducted and thus the collection has received little attention from researchers. Here, the first full account of the herpetology specimens held at the EWNHM is provided, with voucher information for all documented specimens to make the collection accessible for future studies.

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          New developments in museum-based informatics and applications in biodiversity analysis.

          Information from natural history collections (NHCs) about the diversity, taxonomy and historical distributions of species worldwide is becoming increasingly available over the Internet. In light of this relatively new and rapidly increasing resource, we critically review its utility and limitations for addressing a diverse array of applications. When integrated with spatial environmental data, NHC data can be used to study a broad range of topics, from aspects of ecological and evolutionary theory, to applications in conservation, agriculture and human health. There are challenges inherent to using NHC data, such as taxonomic inaccuracies and biases in the spatial coverage of data, which require consideration. Promising research frontiers include the integration of NHC data with information from comparative genomics and phylogenetics, and stronger connections between the environmental analysis of NHC data and experimental and field-based tests of hypotheses.
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            Back to the future: museum specimens in population genetics.

            Museums and other natural history collections (NHC) worldwide house millions of specimens. With the advent of molecular genetic approaches these collections have become the source of many fascinating population studies in conservation genetics that contrast historical with present-day genetic diversity. Recent developments in molecular genetics and genomics and the associated statistical tools have opened up the further possibility of studying evolutionary change directly. As we discuss here, we believe that NHC specimens provide a largely underutilized resource for such investigations. However, because DNA extracted from NHC samples is degraded, analyses of such samples are technically demanding and many potential pitfalls exist. Thus, we propose a set of guidelines that outline the steps necessary to begin genetic investigations using specimens from NHC.
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              Applications and limitations of museum data for conservation and ecology, with particular attention to species distribution models

               Tim Newbold (2010)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Zookeys
                Zookeys
                2
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:45048D35-BB1D-5CE8-9668-537E44BD4C7E
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:91BD42D4-90F1-4B45-9350-EEF175B1727A
                ZooKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2989
                1313-2970
                2020
                03 September 2020
                : 965
                : 103-139
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Laboratory of Animal Behaviour and Conservation, College of Biology and the Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China Nanjing Forestry University Nanjing China
                [2 ] Division of EcoScience and Department of Life Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760, South Korea Ewha Womans University Seoul South Korea
                [3 ] Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Science, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24341, South Korea Kangwon National University Chuncheon South Korea
                [4 ] Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom University of Kent Canterbury United Kingdom
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Amaël Borzée ( amaelborzee@ 123456gmail.com )

                Academic editor: Johannes Penner

                Article
                52976
                10.3897/zookeys.965.52976
                7483326
                Yucheol Shin, Yikweon Jang, Steven J. R. Allain, Amaël Borzée

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Funding
                Funded by: National Research Foundation of Korea 501100003725 http://doi.org/10.13039/501100003725
                Categories
                Catalogue
                Amphibia
                Reptilia
                Catalogues and Checklists
                Cenozoic
                South Korea

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