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      Rural empowerment through the arts: The role of the arts in civic and social participation in the Mid West region of Western Australia

      Journal of Rural Studies
      Elsevier BV

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          Art as a means of alleviating social exclusion: Does it really work? A critique of instrumental cultural policies and social impact studies in the UK

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            Smoking behaviours in a remote Australian Indigenous community: the influence of family and other factors.

            In Australia, tobacco smoking is more than twice as common among Indigenous people as non-Indigenous people. Some of the highest smoking rates in the country are in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory of Australia. Owing to this high prevalence, tobacco use today is the single biggest contributing risk factor for excess morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians. Despite this, there is a lack of published research which qualitatively explores the social context of Indigenous smoking behaviour or of meanings and perceptions of smoking among Indigenous people. The aim of this study was to understand why Indigenous people start to smoke, the reasons why they persist in smoking and the obstacles and drivers of quitting. We conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 25 Indigenous community members in two remote communities in the Northern Territory and 13 health staff. The results indicate that there is a complex interplay of historical, social, cultural, psychological and physiological factors which influence the smoking behaviours of Indigenous adults in these communities. In particular, the results signal the importance of the family and kin relations in determining smoking behaviours. While most community participants were influenced by family to initiate and continue to smoke, the health and well being of the family was also cited as a key driver of quit attempts. The results highlight the importance of attending to social and cultural context when designing tobacco control programs for this population. Specifically, this research supports the development of family-centred tobacco control interventions alongside wider policy initiatives to counter the normalisation of smoking and assist individuals to quit.
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              Researching the rural-metropolitan health differential using the 'social determinants of health'.

              Recent research indicates that the health status of rural people is inferior to that of people living in metropolitan Australia. This paper summarises the rural-metropolitan health differential and turns to the field of research being called the social determinants of health for explanations of rural health inequalities. The paper explores the ways in which psychosocial factors can interact with material, behavioural and sociocultural factors to contribute to health outcomes. It suggests that the concepts of place and rurality may be useful in future research on the determinants of population health. Further research issues are identified that need to be addressed if we are to understand the complexities of rural health disadvantage.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Rural Studies
                Journal of Rural Studies
                Elsevier BV
                07430167
                July 2011
                July 2011
                : 27
                : 3
                : 245-253
                Article
                10.1016/j.jrurstud.2011.03.001
                9b98221f-7062-4ca9-b86a-6dae621af76a
                © 2011

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/


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