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      Collective cell migration in development

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      The Journal of Cell Biology

      The Rockefeller University Press

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          Abstract

          During embryonic development, tissues undergo major rearrangements that lead to germ layer positioning, patterning, and organ morphogenesis. Often these morphogenetic movements are accomplished by the coordinated and cooperative migration of the constituent cells, referred to as collective cell migration. The molecular and biomechanical mechanisms underlying collective migration of developing tissues have been investigated in a variety of models, including border cell migration, tracheal branching, blood vessel sprouting, and the migration of the lateral line primordium, neural crest cells, or head mesendoderm. Here we review recent advances in understanding collective migration in these developmental models, focusing on the interaction between cells and guidance cues presented by the microenvironment and on the role of cell–cell adhesion in mechanical and behavioral coupling of cells within the collective.

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          Most cited references 82

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          Random versus directionally persistent cell migration.

          Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as the topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking, integrin co-receptors and actomyosin contraction converge on regulation of the Rho family of GTPases and the control of lamellipodial protrusions to promote directional migration.
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            Endothelial cells dynamically compete for the tip cell position during angiogenic sprouting.

            Sprouting angiogenesis requires the coordinated behaviour of endothelial cells, regulated by Notch and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) signalling. Here, we use computational modelling and genetic mosaic sprouting assays in vitro and in vivo to investigate the regulation and dynamics of endothelial cells during tip cell selection. We find that endothelial cells compete for the tip cell position through relative levels of Vegfr1 and Vegfr2, demonstrating a biological role for differential Vegfr regulation in individual endothelial cells. Differential Vegfr levels affect tip selection only in the presence of a functional Notch system by modulating the expression of the ligand Dll4. Time-lapse microscopy imaging of mosaic sprouts identifies dynamic position shuffling of tip and stalk cells in vitro and in vivo, indicating that the VEGFR-Dll4-Notch signalling circuit is constantly re-evaluated as cells meet new neighbours. The regular exchange of the leading tip cell raises novel implications for the concept of guided angiogenic sprouting.
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              Collective epithelial migration and cell rearrangements drive mammary branching morphogenesis.

              Epithelial organs are built through the movement of groups of interconnected cells. We observed cells in elongating mammary ducts reorganize into a multilayered epithelium, migrate collectively, and rearrange dynamically, all without forming leading cellular extensions. Duct initiation required proliferation, Rac, and myosin light-chain kinase, whereas repolarization to a bilayer depended on Rho kinase. We observed that branching morphogenesis results from the active motility of both luminal and myoepithelial cells. Luminal epithelial cells advanced collectively, whereas myoepithelial cells appeared to restrain elongating ducts. Significantly, we observed that normal epithelium and neoplastic hyperplasias are organized similarly, suggesting common mechanisms of epithelial growth.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Cell Biol
                J. Cell Biol
                jcb
                jcb
                The Journal of Cell Biology
                The Rockefeller University Press
                0021-9525
                1540-8140
                18 January 2016
                : 212
                : 2
                : 143-155
                Affiliations
                Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, England, UK
                Author notes
                Correspondence to Roberto Mayor: r.mayor@ 123456ucl.ac.uk
                Article
                201508047
                10.1083/jcb.201508047
                4738384
                26783298
                © 2016 Scarpa and Mayor

                This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.rupress.org/terms). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

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