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      Electromagnetic Signatures of Neutron Star Mergers in the Advanced LIGO Era

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          Abstract

          The mergers of binaries containing neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes are the most promising sources for direct detection in gravitational waves by the interferometers Advanced LIGO and Virgo over the next few years. The concurrent detection of electromagnetic emission from these events would greatly enhance the scientific return of these discoveries. Here we review the state of the art in modeling the electromagnetic signal of neutron star binary mergers across different phases of the merger and multiple wavelengths. We focus on those observables which provide the most sensitive diagnostics of the merger physics and the contribution to the synthesis of rapid neutron capture (\(r\)-process) elements in the Galaxy. We also outline expected future developments on the observational and theoretical sides of this rapidly evolving field.

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          Advanced LIGO: the next generation of gravitational wave detectors

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            Neutrino-driven winds from young, hot neutron stars

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              Detector configuration of KAGRA - the Japanese cryogenic gravitational-wave detector

              Construction of the Japanese second-generation gravitational-wave detector KAGRA has been started. In the next 6 \sim 7 years, we will be able to observe the space-time ripple from faraway galaxies. KAGRA is equipped with the latest advanced technologies. The entire 3-km long detector is located in the underground to be isolated from the seismic motion, the core optics are cooled down to 20 K to reduce thermal fluctuations, and quantum non-demolition techniques are used to decrease quantum noise. In this paper, we introduce the detector configuration of KAGRA; its design, strategy, and downselection of parameters.
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                1512.05435

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