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      The microRNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans.

      Genes & development

      Base Sequence, Animals, Blotting, Northern, Caenorhabditis elegans, genetics, growth & development, Cloning, Molecular, Computational Biology, Conserved Sequence, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Library, Genes, Helminth, Humans, MicroRNAs, Molecular Sequence Data, Nucleic Acid Conformation, RNA, Helminth, chemistry, RNA, Untranslated, metabolism, Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid, Transcription Initiation Site

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          Abstract

          MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of tiny RNAs thought to regulate the expression of protein-coding genes in plants and animals. In the present study, we describe a computational procedure to identify miRNA genes conserved in more than one genome. Applying this program, known as MiRscan, together with molecular identification and validation methods, we have identified most of the miRNA genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The total number of validated miRNA genes stands at 88, with no more than 35 genes remaining to be detected or validated. These 88 miRNA genes represent 48 gene families; 46 of these families (comprising 86 of the 88 genes) are conserved in Caenorhabditis briggsae, and 22 families are conserved in humans. More than a third of the worm miRNAs, including newly identified members of the lin-4 and let-7 gene families, are differentially expressed during larval development, suggesting a role for these miRNAs in mediating larval developmental transitions. Most are present at very high steady-state levels-more than 1000 molecules per cell, with some exceeding 50,000 molecules per cell. Our census of the worm miRNAs and their expression patterns helps define this class of noncoding RNAs, lays the groundwork for functional studies, and provides the tools for more comprehensive analyses of miRNA genes in other species.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          12672692
          196042
          10.1101/gad.1074403

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