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      A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

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          Abstract

          Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and phagosome-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of 25% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB and PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein locations for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

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          Most cited references46

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          Evaluation of multidimensional chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS) for large-scale protein analysis: the yeast proteome.

          Highly complex protein mixtures can be directly analyzed after proteolysis by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this paper, we have utilized the combination of strong cation exchange (SCX) and reversed-phase (RP) chromatography to achieve two-dimensional separation prior to MS/MS. One milligram of whole yeast protein was proteolyzed and separated by SCX chromatography (2.1 mm i.d.) with fraction collection every minute during an 80-min elution. Eighty fractions were reduced in volume and then re-injected via an autosampler in an automated fashion using a vented-column (100 microm i.d.) approach for RP-LC-MS/MS analysis. More than 162,000 MS/MS spectra were collected with 26,815 matched to yeast peptides (7,537 unique peptides). A total of 1,504 yeast proteins were unambiguously identified in this single analysis. We present a comparison of this experiment with a previously published yeast proteome analysis by Yates and colleagues (Washburn, M. P.; Wolters, D.; Yates, J. R., III. Nat. Biotechnol. 2001, 19, 242-7). In addition, we report an in-depth analysis of the false-positive rates associated with peptide identification using the Sequest algorithm and a reversed yeast protein database. New criteria are proposed to decrease false-positives to less than 1% and to greatly reduce the need for manual interpretation while permitting more proteins to be identified.
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            Macrophage-dependent induction of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 type III secretion system and its role in intracellular survival.

            Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) encodes a putative type III secretion system necessary for systemic infection in animals. We have investigated the transcriptional organization and regulation of SPI-2 by creating gfp fusions throughout the entire gene cluster. These gfp fusions demonstrated that SPI-2 genes encoding structural, regulatory and previously uncharacterized putative secreted proteins are preferentially expressed in the intracellular environment of the host macrophage. Furthermore, the transcription of these genes within host cells was dependent on the two-component regulatory system SsrA/SsrB and an acidic phagosomal environment. Most SPI-2 mutants failed to replicate to the same level as wild-type strains in murine macrophages and human epithelial cells. In orally infected mice, SPI-2 mutants colonized the Peyer's patches but did not progress to the mesenteric lymph nodes. We conclude that SPI-2 genes are specifically expressed upon entry into mammalian cells and are required for intracellular growth in host cells in vivo and in vitro.
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              Spectral probabilities and generating functions of tandem mass spectra: a strike against decoy databases.

              A key problem in computational proteomics is distinguishing between correct and false peptide identifications. We argue that evaluating the error rates of peptide identifications is not unlike computing generating functions in combinatorics. We show that the generating functions and their derivatives ( spectral energy and spectral probability) represent new features of tandem mass spectra that, similarly to Delta-scores, significantly improve peptide identifications. Furthermore, the spectral probability provides a rigorous solution to the problem of computing statistical significance of spectral identifications. The spectral energy/probability approach improves the sensitivity-specificity tradeoff of existing MS/MS search tools, addresses the notoriously difficult problem of "one-hit-wonders" in mass spectrometry, and often eliminates the need for decoy database searches. We therefore argue that the generating function approach has the potential to increase the number of peptide identifications in MS/MS searches.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Proteomics
                Int J Proteomics
                IJPRO
                International Journal of Proteomics
                Hindawi Publishing Corporation
                2090-2166
                2090-2174
                2012
                25 July 2012
                : 2012
                Affiliations
                1Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352, USA
                2Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dive, La Jolla, CA 92063, USA
                3Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA
                Author notes

                Academic Editor: Gary B. Smejkal

                Article
                10.1155/2012/123076
                3410353
                22900174
                9c4d694d-5ca1-45a9-8a86-6423fec38c39
                Copyright © 2012 Roslyn N. Brown et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Research Article

                Molecular biology
                Molecular biology

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