Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Comparison of orbicularis oris muscle strength and endurance in young and elderly adults

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the strength and endurance of the orbicularis oris muscle in healthy Korean (young vs. elderly adults). [Participants and Methods] A total of 60 participants (30 young adults and 30 elderly adults) were recruited. The Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was used to measure orbicularis oris muscle maximal strength and endurance. [Results] Elderly adults showed significantly lower orbicularis oris muscle strength and endurance than younger adults. [Conclusion] This study confirmed a significant age-related decrease in orbicularis oris muscle strength and endurance. The data collected will be useful as a basis for future on speech and swallowing therapy.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 6

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Age and sex differences in orofacial strength.

          This study explored age- and sex-related differences in orofacial strength. Healthy adult men (N = 88) and women (N = 83) participated in the study. Strength measures were obtained using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI). Anterior and posterior tongue elevation strength measures were obtained using a standard method. Tongue protrusion and lateralization, cheek compression, and lip compression measures utilized adaptors allowing the participant to exert pressure against the bulb in different orientations. Lip and cheek strength measures were greater for men than women, but tongue strength did not differ between sex groups. Strong correlations between age and strength were not observed. However, group comparisons revealed lower tongue protrusion and lateralization strength in the oldest participants. The oldest participants also exhibited lower anterior and posterior tongue elevation strength relative to the middle-age group. Cheek and lip compression strength demonstrated no age-related differences. The current study supplements and corroborates existing literature that shows that older adults demonstrate lower tongue strength than younger adults. Sex differences were noted such that men demonstrated greater lip and cheek strength but not tongue strength. These data add to the literature on normal orofacial strength, allowing for more informed interpretations of orofacial weakness in persons with dysphagia.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Muscle mass and muscle strength are associated with pre- and post-hospitalization falls in older male inpatients: a longitudinal cohort study

            Background Low muscle mass and strength are highly prevalent in inpatients. It is acknowledged that low muscle mass and strength are associated with falls in community-dwelling older adults, but it is unknown if these muscle measures are also associated with falls in a population of older inpatients. This study aimed to investigate the association between muscle measures and pre- and post-hospitalization falls in older inpatients. Methods An inception cohort of patients aged 70 years and older, admitted to an academic teaching hospital, was included in this study. Muscle mass and hand grip strength were measured at admission using bioelectrical impedance analysis and handheld dynamometry. Pre-hospitalization falls were dichotomized as having had at least one fall in the six months prior to admission. Post-hospitalization falls were dichotomized as having had at least one fall during the three months after discharge. Associations were analysed with logistic regression analysis. Results The study cohort comprised 378 inpatients (mean age, SD: 79.7, 6.4 years). Fifty per cent of female and 41% of male patients reported at least one fall prior to hospitalization. Post-hospitalization, 18% of female and 23% of male patients reported at least one fall. Lower muscle mass was associated with post-hospitalization falls, and lower hand grip strength was associated with both pre- and post-hospitalization falls in male, but not in female, patients. Conclusions These findings confirm the likely involvement of muscle mass and strength in the occurrence of pre- and post-hospitalization falls in a population of older inpatients, but only in males. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (10.1186/s12877-018-0812-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Muscle strength and size are associated with motor unit connectivity in aged mice

              In older adults, the loss of muscle strength (dynapenia) and the loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) are important contributors to the loss of physical function. We sought to investigate dynapenia, sarcopenia, and the loss of motor unit function in aging mice. C57BL/6J mice were analyzed with cross-sectional (males: 3 vs. 27 months; males and females: 8 vs. 12 vs. 20 months) and longitudinal studies (males: 10–25 months) using in vivo electrophysiological measures of motor unit connectivity (triceps surae compound muscle action potential and motor unit number estimation), in vivo measures of plantar flexion torque, magnetic resonance imaging of hind limb muscle volume, and grip strength. Compound muscle action potential amplitude, motor unit number estimation, and plantar flexion torque were decreased at 20 months. In contrast, grip strength was reduced at 24 months. Motor unit number estimates correlated with muscle torque and hind limb muscle volume. Our results demonstrate that the loss of motor unit connectivity is an early finding in aging male and female mice and that muscle size and contractility are both associated with motor unit number.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Phys Ther Sci
                J Phys Ther Sci
                JPTS
                Journal of Physical Therapy Science
                The Society of Physical Therapy Science
                0915-5287
                2187-5626
                3 December 2018
                December 2018
                : 30
                : 12
                : 1477-1478
                Affiliations
                [1) ] Department of Occupational Therapy, Kyungdong University: 815 Gyeonhwon-ro, Munmak-eup, Wonju-si, Gangwon-do, Republic of Korea
                [2) ] Department of Emergency Medical Services, Kyungdong University, Republic of Korea
                [3) ] Department of Physical Therapy, Kyungwoon University, Republic of Korea
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. Kim Hee Jeong (E-mail: hjk@ 123456kduniv.ac.kr )
                Article
                jpts-2018-306
                10.1589/jpts.30.1477
                6279697
                2018©by the Society of Physical Therapy Science. Published by IPEC Inc.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives (by-nc-nd) License. (CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ )

                Categories
                Original Article

                endurance, orbicularis oris muscle, strength

                Comments

                Comment on this article