Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    recommends
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Do the shuffle: Exploring reasons for music listening through shuffled play

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Adults listen to music for an average of 18 hours a week (with some people reaching more than double that). With rapidly changing technology, music collections have become overwhelmingly digital ushering in changes in listening habits, especially when it comes to listening on personal devices. By using interactive visualizations, descriptive analysis and thematic analysis, this project aims to explore why people download and listen to music and which aspects of the music listening experience are prioritized when people talk about tracks on their device. Using a newly developed data collection method, Shuffled Play, 397 participants answered open-ended and closed research questions through a short online questionnaire after shuffling their music library and playing two pieces as prompts for reflections. The findings of this study highlight that when talking about tracks on their personal devices, people prioritise characterizing them using sound and musical features and associating them with the informational context around them (artist, album, and genre) over their emotional responses to them. The results also highlight that people listen to and download music because they like it–a straightforward but important observation that is sometimes glossed over in previous research. These findings have implications for future work in understanding music, its uses and its functions in peoples’ everyday lives.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 36

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Using thematic analysis in psychology

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Snowball Sampling

             Leo Goodman (1961)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              The Musicality of Non-Musicians: An Index for Assessing Musical Sophistication in the General Population

              Musical skills and expertise vary greatly in Western societies. Individuals can differ in their repertoire of musical behaviours as well as in the level of skill they display for any single musical behaviour. The types of musical behaviours we refer to here are broad, ranging from performance on an instrument and listening expertise, to the ability to employ music in functional settings or to communicate about music. In this paper, we first describe the concept of ‘musical sophistication’ which can be used to describe the multi-faceted nature of musical expertise. Next, we develop a novel measurement instrument, the Goldsmiths Musical Sophistication Index (Gold-MSI) to assess self-reported musical skills and behaviours on multiple dimensions in the general population using a large Internet sample (n = 147,636). Thirdly, we report results from several lab studies, demonstrating that the Gold-MSI possesses good psychometric properties, and that self-reported musical sophistication is associated with performance on two listening tasks. Finally, we identify occupation, occupational status, age, gender, and wealth as the main socio-demographic factors associated with musical sophistication. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical accounts of implicit and statistical music learning and with regard to social conditions of sophisticated musical engagement.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: MethodologyRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: VisualizationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Data curationRole: MethodologyRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                6 February 2020
                2020
                : 15
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Psychology Department, Goldsmiths, University of London, London, United Kingdom
                [2 ] Centre for Performance Science, Royal College of Music, London, United Kingdom
                [3 ] Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
                [4 ] University of Granada, Granada, Spain
                [5 ] School of Psychology, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom
                KITE-Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, CANADA
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-19-17641
                10.1371/journal.pone.0228457
                7004375
                32027672
                © 2020 Sanfilippo et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Counts
                Figures: 5, Tables: 2, Pages: 21
                Product
                Funding
                This work is funded by the EU H2020 programme (ga No. 743623). NS has been supported by HEartS, a project funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council to investigate the health, economic and social impact of the arts (grant ref. AH/P005888/1) to MMS. The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Emotions
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Emotions
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Cognitive Science
                Cognitive Psychology
                Music Cognition
                Music Perception
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Music Cognition
                Music Perception
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Music Cognition
                Music Perception
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Sensory Perception
                Music Perception
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Sensory Perception
                Music Perception
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Sensory Perception
                Music Perception
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Complementary and Alternative Medicine
                Music Therapy
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Research Design
                Survey Research
                Questionnaires
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Cognitive Science
                Cognitive Psychology
                Music Cognition
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Music Cognition
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Music Cognition
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Research Design
                Survey Research
                Surveys
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Research Facilities
                Information Centers
                Libraries
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Behavior
                Habits
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Behavior
                Habits
                Custom metadata
                All of the raw data is freely available and can be downloaded for reuse from [ https://miguems.github.io/dotheshuffle/], a webpage specifically designed to accompany this paper.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article