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      Physiological Concentrations of Dopamine Inhibit the Proliferation and Cytotoxicity of Human CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells in vitro: A Receptor-Mediated Mechanism

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          Abstract

          Objective: Dopamine, a catecholamine neurotransmitter, influences growth and proliferation of lymphocytes. Pharmacological doses of dopamine have been shown to modulate T cell functions significantly, but no information is available on the effect of physiological concentrations of circulating dopamine on CD4+ and CD8+ T cell functions. This information may be of importance since significantly elevated plasma dopamine levels were observed in humans during uncoping stress, and suppression of T cell functions during stress is a well-known phenomenon. However, the mechanism inducing the suppression of T cell functions during stress is not yet clear. In the present investigation, we evaluated the effect of the dopamine level attained in the plasma of individuals with uncoping stress on the proliferation and cytotoxicity of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. Methods: T cell subpopulations were separated by panning. The effect of dopamine on IL-2-induced cell proliferation in vitro was evaluated by [<sup>3</sup>H]thymidine incorporation and cytotoxicity by <sup>51</sup>Cr release, receptors by radioligand binding, cAMP by an assay kit and apoptosis by DNA fragmentation. Results: At these elevated physiological concentrations, dopamine was found to inhibit significantly the proliferation and cytotoxicity of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. This dopamine-mediated inhibition of proliferation was more marked on CD8+ T cells than on CD4+ T cells. The underlying mechanism was found to be D1 class of dopamine-receptor-mediated stimulation of intracellular cAMP. Conclusion: Results may be of significance to understand the role of peripheral dopamine in human neuroimmune communication in terms of physiological homeostasis in health and disease.

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          Most cited references 5

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          Beta-adrenergic receptors on human suppressor, helper, and cytolytic lymphocytes.

          Using the radioligand beta-adrenergic blocker [125I]cyanopindolol (ICYP), we have characterized the beta-adrenergic receptors on Leu 3+ (T helper [TH]), Leu 2+, 9.3- (T suppressor [Ts]) and Leu 2+, 9.3+ (T cytolytic [Tc]) subsets of human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood T cells were isolated by rosetting, and then subsets were purified by their affinities to monoclonal antibodies against their Leu 3 and 9.3 markers. ICYP binding to the subsets was saturable with time and with concentration; the binding was stereoselective and reversible by beta-adrenergic antagonists. A biological response produced by beta agonists increased intracellular concentrations of cAMP and corresponded to the number of binding sites. Each subset of cells had a number of binding sites, which was characteristic for the given subset. The data indicate that the density of distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors was not homogeneous on the precursors of phenotypically and functionally distinct T cells (Ts approximately 2900, Tc approximately 1800 and TH approximately 750 binding sites). The displacement studies using beta-adrenergic agonists were performed on the cytolytic and suppressor T cell subsets, suggesting that the receptors were mainly of the beta-2 type. The immunobiological significance of such selective distribution of numbers and subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors on distinct T cell subsets is under investigation.
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            Elevated plasma dopamine in posttraumatic stress disorder: a preliminary report.

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              • Article: not found

              Uptake and biodistribution of dopamine in bone marrow, spleen and lymph nodes of normal and tumor bearing mice

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NIM
                Neuroimmunomodulation
                10.1159/issn.1021-7401
                Neuroimmunomodulation
                S. Karger AG
                1021-7401
                1423-0216
                2001
                June 2001
                29 June 2001
                : 9
                : 1
                : 23-33
                Affiliations
                aSignal Transduction and Biogenic Amines Lab, and Departments of bSurgical and cMedical Oncology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, Calcutta, India
                Article
                49004 Neuroimmunomodulation 2001;9:23–33
                10.1159/000049004
                11435749
                © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 9, Tables: 6, References: 37, Pages: 11
                Categories
                Original Paper

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