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Impact of skeletal divergence on oral health-related quality of life and self-reported jaw function

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      Abstract

      Objective

      To investigate the differences in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and self-reported jaw function between patients with hyperdivergent and normodivergent facial types.

      Methods

      Eighty patients with a distinctively hyperdivergent facial type (mandibular plane angle greater than 2 standard deviations, or 42°) and 80 controls were individually matched according to age, sex, ethnicity, and treatment stage. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires such as the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS-8).

      Results

      The mean age of the patients was 17.2 ± 4.6 years (range, 12–9 years), with most (65.0%) being female and of New Zealand European origin (91.3%). Individuals with hyperdivergent facial types had higher overall and social domain scores on the OHIP-14 ( p < 0.05) than did the ones with normodivergent facial types. However, the intergroup differences in JFLS-8 scores were not significant ( p > 0.05).

      Conclusions

      Jaw function appears to be similar in individuals with hyperdivergent and normodivergent facial morphologies. However, those with hyperdivergent facial types are more likely to self-report poorer OHRQoL than are those with normal faces, especially in relation to social aspects.

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      Most cited references 32

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      Derivation and validation of a short-form oral health impact profile.

      Growing recognition that quality of life is an important outcome of dental care has created a need for a range of instruments to measure oral health-related quality of life. This study aimed to derive a subset of items from the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49)-a 49-item questionnaire that measures people's perceptions of the impact of oral conditions on their well-being. Secondary analysis was conducted using data from an epidemiologic study of 1217 people aged 60+ years in South Australia. Internal reliability analysis, factor analysis and regression analysis were undertaken to derive a subset (OHIP-14) questionnaire and its validity was evaluated by assessing associations with sociodemographic and clinical oral status variables. Internal reliability of the OHIP-14 was evaluated using Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Regression analysis yielded an optimal set of 14 questions. The OHIP-14 accounted for 94% of variance in the OHIP-49; had high reliability (alpha = 0.88); contained questions from each of the seven conceptual dimensions of the OHIP-49; and had a good distribution of prevalence for individual questions. OHIP-14 scores and OHIP-49 scores displayed the same pattern of variation among sociodemographic groups of older adults. In a multivariate analysis of dentate people, eight oral status and sociodemographic variables were associated (P < 0.05) with both the OHIP-49 and the OHIP-14. While it will be important to replicate these findings in other populations, the findings suggest that the OHIP-14 has good reliability, validity and precision.
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        Research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders: review, criteria, examinations and specifications, critique.

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          Orthodontic treatment and its impact on oral health-related quality of life in Brazilian adolescents.

          To assess whether Brazilian adolescents who had completed orthodontic treatment had lower levels of impacts on their oral health-related quality of life. A cross-sectional study. The study was conducted in public and private secondary schools in Bauru-SP, Brazil. 1675 randomly selected adolescents aged between 15 and 16 years. Adolescents were clinically examined using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Two oral health-related quality of life measures, namely the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) and the shortened version of the Oral Health Impacts Profile (OHIP-14) were used to assess adolescents' oral health-related impacts. Multiple logistic regression was used in the data analysis. A response rate of 100% was obtained. Adolescents who had completed orthodontic treatment had fewer oral health-related impacts compared to the other two groups. They were 1.85 times (95% CI 1.30 to 2.62) less likely to have an oral health impact on their daily life activities than adolescents currently under treatment or 1.43 (1.01 to 2.02) times than those who never had treatment. Adolescents who had completed orthodontic treatment had a better oral health-related quality of life than those currently under treatment or those who never had treatment.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [a ]Department of Oral Sciences, Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
            [b ]Department of Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
            [c ]Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and Oral Science, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy.
            Author notes
            Corresponding author: Joseph Safwat Antoun. Senior Lecturer, Discipline of Orthodontics, Department of Oral Sciences, Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, North Dunedin, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand. Tel: +64-3-479-7071, joseph.antoun@ 123456otago.ac.nz
            Journal
            Korean J Orthod
            Korean J Orthod
            KJOD
            Korean Journal of Orthodontics
            Korean Association of Orthodontists
            2234-7518
            2005-372X
            May 2017
            13 March 2017
            : 47
            : 3
            : 186-194
            5432440
            10.4041/kjod.2017.47.3.186
            © 2017 The Korean Association of Orthodontists.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Funding
            Funded by: New Zealand Dental Association's Research Foundation;
            Funded by: Health Research Council of New Zealand, CrossRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001505;
            Funded by: New Zealand Association of Orthodontists;
            Funded by: Foundation for Orthodontic Research and Education;
            Categories
            Original Article

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