17
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Assessing the Impact of a Novel Smartphone Application Compared With Standard Follow-Up on Mobility of Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis Following Treatment With Hylan G-F 20: A Randomized Controlled Trial

      research-article

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability in the United States. Although no disease-modifying therapies exist, patients with knee OA who increase walking may reduce risk of functional limitations.

          Objective

          The objective of the study is to evaluate the impact of a mobile app (OA GO) plus wearable activity monitor/pedometer (Jawbone UP 24) used for 90 days on the mobility of patients with knee OA treated with hylan G-F 20.

          Methods

          Patients with knee OA aged 30 to 80 years who were eligible to receive hylan G-F 20 and were familiar with smartphone technology were enrolled in this randomized, multicenter, open-label study. Patients who had a body mass index above 35 kg/m 2 were excluded. All patients received a single 6-mL injection of hylan G-F 20 and wore the Jawbone monitor. The patients were then randomized 1:1 to Jawbone and OA GO (Group A; n=107) with visible feedback (unblinded) or Jawbone only (Group B; n=104) with no visible feedback (blinded). The primary endpoint was mean change from baseline in steps per day at day 90 between Groups A and B.

          Results

          Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. There were significant differences between the increases in least squares (LS) mean number of steps per day (1199 vs 467, P=.03) and the mean percentage change (35.8% vs 11.5%, P=.02) from baseline in favor of Group A over Group B. There was a greater reduction in pain from baseline during the 6-minute walk test in Group A versus Group B. (LS mean change: −55.3 vs −33.8, P=.007). Most patients (65.4%) and surveys of physicians (67.3%) reported they would be likely or very likely to use/recommend the devices. Patient Activity Measure-13 scores improved from baseline (LS mean change for Groups A and B: 5.0 vs 6.9), with no significant differences between groups. The occurrence of adverse events was similar in the 2 groups.

          Conclusions

          Use of a novel smartphone app in conjunction with a wearable activity monitor provided additional improvement on mobility parameters such as steps per day and pain with walking in the 6-minute walk test in patients with knee OA who were treated with hylan G-F 20. Results also highlight the amenability of patients and physicians to using mobile health technology in the treatment of OA and suggest further study is warranted.

          Related collections

          Most cited references33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          OARSI recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, Part II: OARSI evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines.

          To develop concise, patient-focussed, up to date, evidence-based, expert consensus recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), which are adaptable and designed to assist physicians and allied health care professionals in general and specialist practise throughout the world. Sixteen experts from four medical disciplines (primary care, rheumatology, orthopaedics and evidence-based medicine), two continents and six countries (USA, UK, France, Netherlands, Sweden and Canada) formed the guidelines development team. A systematic review of existing guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA published between 1945 and January 2006 was undertaken using the validated appraisal of guidelines research and evaluation (AGREE) instrument. A core set of management modalities was generated based on the agreement between guidelines. Evidence before 2002 was based on a systematic review conducted by European League Against Rheumatism and evidence after 2002 was updated using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, the Cochrane Library and HTA reports. The quality of evidence was evaluated, and where possible, effect size (ES), number needed to treat, relative risk or odds ratio and cost per quality-adjusted life years gained were estimated. Consensus recommendations were produced following a Delphi exercise and the strength of recommendation (SOR) for propositions relating to each modality was determined using a visual analogue scale. Twenty-three treatment guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA were identified from the literature search, including six opinion-based, five evidence-based and 12 based on both expert opinion and research evidence. Twenty out of 51 treatment modalities addressed by these guidelines were universally recommended. ES for pain relief varied from treatment to treatment. Overall there was no statistically significant difference between non-pharmacological therapies [0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16, 0.34] and pharmacological therapies (ES=0.39, 95% CI 0.31, 0.47). Following feedback from Osteoarthritis Research International members on the draft guidelines and six Delphi rounds consensus was reached on 25 carefully worded recommendations. Optimal management of patients with OA hip or knee requires a combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities of therapy. Recommendations cover the use of 12 non-pharmacological modalities: education and self-management, regular telephone contact, referral to a physical therapist, aerobic, muscle strengthening and water-based exercises, weight reduction, walking aids, knee braces, footwear and insoles, thermal modalities, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and acupuncture. Eight recommendations cover pharmacological modalities of treatment including acetaminophen, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) non-selective and selective oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), topical NSAIDs and capsaicin, intra-articular injections of corticosteroids and hyaluronates, glucosamine and/or chondroitin sulphate for symptom relief; glucosamine sulphate, chondroitin sulphate and diacerein for possible structure-modifying effects and the use of opioid analgesics for the treatment of refractory pain. There are recommendations covering five surgical modalities: total joint replacements, unicompartmental knee replacement, osteotomy and joint preserving surgical procedures; joint lavage and arthroscopic debridement in knee OA, and joint fusion as a salvage procedure when joint replacement had failed. Strengths of recommendation and 95% CIs are provided. Twenty-five carefully worded recommendations have been generated based on a critical appraisal of existing guidelines, a systematic review of research evidence and the consensus opinions of an international, multidisciplinary group of experts. The recommendations may be adapted for use in different countries or regions according to the availability of treatment modalities and SOR for each modality of therapy. These recommendations will be revised regularly following systematic review of new research evidence as this becomes available.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            CONSORT 2010 statement: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomized trials.

            The CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement is used worldwide to improve the reporting of randomized, controlled trials. Schulz and colleagues describe the latest version, CONSORT 2010, which updates the reporting guideline based on new methodological evidence and accumulating experience.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Development and testing of a short form of the patient activation measure.

              The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) is a 22-item measure that assesses patient knowledge, skill, and confidence for self-management. The measure was developed using Rasch analyses and is an interval level, unidimensional, Guttman-like measure. The current analysis is aimed at reducing the number of items in the measure while maintaining adequate precision. We relied on an iterative use of Rasch analysis to identify items that could be eliminated without loss of significant precision and reliability. With each item deletion, the item scale locations were recalibrated and the person reliability evaluated to check if and how much of a decline in precision of measurement resulted from the deletion of the item. The data used in the analysis were the same data used in the development of the original 22-item measure. These data were collected in 2003 via a telephone survey of 1,515 randomly selected adults. Principal Findings. The analysis yielded a 13-item measure that has psychometric properties similar to the original 22-item version. The scores for the 13-item measure range in value from 38.6 to 53.0 (on a theoretical 0-100 point scale). The range of values is essentially unchanged from the original 22-item version. Subgroup analysis suggests that there is a slight loss of precision with some subgroups. The results of the analysis indicate that the shortened 13-item version is both reliable and valid.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                JMIR Mhealth Uhealth
                JMIR Mhealth Uhealth
                JMU
                JMIR mHealth and uHealth
                JMIR Publications (Toronto, Canada )
                2291-5222
                May 2017
                09 May 2017
                : 5
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1] 1Tucson Orthopaedic Institute Tucson, AZUnited States
                [2] 2Cedar-Sinai Orthopaedic Center Los Angeles, CAUnited States
                [3] 3University of California Los Angeles Medical Center Los Angeles, CAUnited States
                [4] 4National Clinical Research–Richmond Richmond, VAUnited States
                [5] 5Sanofi Laval, QCCanada
                [6] 6Sanofi ParisFrance
                Author notes
                Corresponding Author: Nebojsa Skrepnik NSkrepnik@ 123456tucsonortho.com
                Article
                v5i5e64
                10.2196/mhealth.7179
                5442351
                28487266
                9d29c338-594f-4306-9a38-aebdbc37399c
                ©Nebojsa Skrepnik, Andrew Spitzer, Roy Altman, John Hoekstra, John Stewart, Richard Toselli. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 09.05.2017.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR mhealth and uhealth, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mhealth.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.

                Categories
                Original Paper
                Original Paper

                mobile health,mhealth,mobile apps,osteoarthritis,osteoarthritis, knee,hylan g-f 20,synvisc

                Comments

                Comment on this article