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      Theophilus’ Auctoritas: The Role of De urinis in the Medical Curriculum of the 12th–13th Centuries

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          Abstract

          The three principles to know, to know how and to know how to be are already condensed in the works of Theophilos (7th–9th centuries). Theophilus’ De urinis was included in Latin translation in the Articella, probably because of its intermediate position between the texts of high doctrinal value by Hippocrates and Galen (lacking, however, a unifying ‘theory of urine’) and the epitomes, short manuals without any theoretical background. It thus forms an excellent synthesis of a cultural approach reconciling iatrosophia and techne and offers to the reader a text reconciling the theory and the practice, useful to health workers in hospitals, novice beginners and medical scholars. Thanks to his strong attention to the correlation between symptoms and pathology and to his search for assessment scales, Theophilus became the author on whom the birth of medical medieval studies was founded.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          AJN
          Am J Nephrol
          10.1159/issn.0250-8095
          American Journal of Nephrology
          S. Karger AG
          978-3-8055-6855-5
          978-3-318-00128-0
          0250-8095
          1421-9670
          1999
          April 1999
          23 April 1999
          : 19
          : 2
          : 165-171
          Affiliations
          Section of History of Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’, Rome, Italy
          Article
          13445 Am J Nephrol 1999;19:165–171
          10.1159/000013445
          10213813
          © 1999 S. Karger AG, Basel

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          Page count
          References: 28, Pages: 7
          Product
          Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/13445
          Categories
          Origins of Nephrology – Middle Ages, Renaissance

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