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      Bavarian German r-Flapping: Evidence for a dialect-specific sonority hierarchy

      research-article
      1
      Glossa: a journal of general linguistics
      Ubiquity Press
      rhotics, emergence, Bavarian German, sonority hierarchy, flap, trill

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          Abstract

          In certain varieties of Bavarian German, where both liquids vocalize in the syllable coda, word-final sequences of /ʀl/ are realized with a flapped r as the onset to a syllable with nuclear syllabic l ([l̩]). In this article, I discuss one such variety of Bavarian German, presenting data and analysis of Bavarian German Flapping, as well as Liquid Vocalization. This paper argues that Bavarian German Flapping repairs a sonority plateau created by adjacent liquids; it is shown that Bavarian German necessitates its own unique sonority hierarchy, as opposed to one German-specific hierarchy (cf. Wiese 1996) or a universal hierarchy (cf. Parker 2008; 2011). There are several theoretical contributions of this paper: first, I show that in languages, such as Bavarian German, where two or more rhotics behave differently in terms of sonority, the language’s sonority hierarchy must divide the class of liquids, specifically placing trills and flaps at different levels of sonority; I propose such a sonority hierarchy for Bavarian German. Additionally, this analysis engages with research on sonority which promotes universal sonority hierarchies determined via phonetics (cf. Parker 2008; 2011); the current analysis argues that such a universal sonority hierarchy cannot account for the Bavarian German data (i.e. Flapping). Finally, with the proposed dialect-specific sonority hierarchy, it is argued that sonority is emergent and not universal. While emergence has been widely discussed in particularly phonological and morpho-phonological literature (see Mielke 2008; Archangeli & Pulleyblank 2016), it has not been extended specifically to phonological sonority; thus, this is a central contribution of the article.

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          Most cited references66

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          The sound pattern of English

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            The Blackwell Companion to Phonology

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2397-1835
                Glossa: a journal of general linguistics
                Ubiquity Press
                2397-1835
                12 July 2019
                2019
                : 4
                : 1
                : 79
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of Northern Colorado, World Languages and Cultures, Greeley, CO, US
                Article
                10.5334/gjgl.789
                9d866ec9-a6c7-49fe-a862-cd4562919dc8
                Copyright: © 2019 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 26 August 2018
                : 23 April 2019
                Categories
                Research

                General linguistics,Linguistics & Semiotics
                trill,flap,sonority hierarchy,Bavarian German,emergence,rhotics

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