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      Shared Reality, System Justification, and the Relational Basis of Ideological Beliefs

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      Social and Personality Psychology Compass
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references37

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          A Decade of System Justification Theory: Accumulated Evidence of Conscious and Unconscious Bolstering of the Status Quo

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            Party over policy: The dominating impact of group influence on political beliefs.

            Four studies demonstrated both the power of group influence in persuasion and people's blindness to it. Even under conditions of effortful processing, attitudes toward a social policy depended almost exclusively upon the stated position of one's political party. This effect overwhelmed the impact of both the policy's objective content and participants' ideological beliefs (Studies 1-3), and it was driven by a shift in the assumed factual qualities of the policy and in its perceived moral connotations (Study 4). Nevertheless, participants denied having been influenced by their political group, although they believed that other individuals, especially their ideological adversaries, would be so influenced. The underappreciated role of social identity in persuasion is discussed.
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              Complementary justice: effects of "poor but happy" and "poor but honest" stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive.

              It was hypothesized that exposure to complementary representations of the poor as happier and more honest than the rich would lead to increased support for the status quo. In Study 1, exposure to "poor but happy" and "rich but miserable" stereotype exemplars led people to score higher on a general measure of system justification, compared with people who were exposed to noncomplementary exemplars. Study 2 replicated this effect with "poor but honest" and "rich but dishonest" complementary stereotypes. In Studies 3 and 4, exposure to noncomplementary stereotype exemplars implicitly activated justice concerns, as indicated by faster reaction times to justice-related than neutral words in a lexical decision task. Evidence also suggested that the Protestant work ethic may moderate the effects of stereotype exposure on explicit system justification (but not implicit activation).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Social and Personality Psychology Compass
                Social Pers Psych Compass
                Wiley-Blackwell
                1751-9004
                1751-9004
                January 2008
                January 2008
                : 2
                : 1
                : 171-186
                Article
                10.1111/j.1751-9004.2007.00056.x
                9e498010-5fbc-4a80-99af-9d4481ff6a49
                © 2008

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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