3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Effect of short-term high-temperatures on the growth, development and reproduction in the fruit fly, Bactrocera tau (Diptera: Tephritidae)

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Bactrocera tau (Walker) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is an economically important invasive pest, that is capable of seriously reducing the quality and yield of vegetables and fruits, it was first recorded from Fujian province in 1849 and later introduced to Yunnan province in 1912 as a result in trade fruits and vegetables of China. In recent years, with the onset of global climate change and the accompanying increase in the greenhouse effect, elevated climatic temperatures have become one of the main environmental factors affecting growth and reproduction in insects, and the optimal developmental temperature of B. tau was found to be from 25 °C to 31 °C, the growth, development and reproduction of B. tau are normal under the optimal temperature conditions. In order to determine the repercussions that elevated temperature have on B. tau, we assessed the effects that short-term (12 h) high-temperature exposures (34 °C, 36 °C, 38 °C, 40 °C, 42 °C, 44 °C, 46 °C, and 48 °C) had on the growth, development and reproduction of B. tau at different developmental stages of the fly. The results showed that the survival rate of B. tau gradually decreased in all stages following exposure to short-term high-temperatures. The pupal stage was the least sensitive to increased temperatures. The pupae withstood the highest lethal temperature, having an LT 50 of 42.060 °C, followed by female adults (40.447 °C), male adults (40.013 °C), and larvae (36.740 °C). The egg stage, which was the most susceptible to heat increases, had the lowest LT 50 (38.310 °C). No significant effects were observed in the developmental stages of B. tau at temperatures from 24 °C to 38 °C. The development duration was significantly prolonged at 40 °C ( P < 0.05) in the eggs (2.830d), larvae (7.330d), and pupae (8.170d) ( P < 0.05). B. tau was unable to survive at temperatures above 42 °C. The pre-oviposition of female adults was extended, the average egg number per female showed a downward trend, the longevity of adults gradually shortened, and the ratio of female to male offspring increased as temperature increments were increased. In summary, short-term high-temperatures over 42 °C were not suitable for successful development of B. tau, while short-term high-temperatures over 40 °C were not suitable for successful reproduction in B. tau.

          Related collections

          Most cited references51

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Behavioral drive versus behavioral inertia in evolution: a null model approach.

          Some biologists embrace the classical view that changes in behavior inevitably initiate or drive evolutionary changes in other traits, yet others note that behavior sometimes inhibits evolutionary changes. Here we develop a null model that quantifies the impact of regulatory behaviors (specifically, thermoregulatory behaviors) on body temperature and on performance of ectotherms. We apply the model to data on a lizard (Anolis cristatellus) and show that thermoregulatory behaviors likely inhibit selection for evolutionary shifts in thermal physiology with altitude. Because behavioral adjustments are commonly used by ectotherms to regulate physiological performance, regulatory behaviors should generally constrain rather than drive evolution, a phenomenon we call the "Bogert effect." We briefly review a few other examples that contradict the classical view of behavior as the inevitable driving force in evolution. Overall, our analysis and brief review challenge the classical view that behavior is invariably the driving force in evolution, and instead our work supports the alternative view that behavior has diverse--and sometimes conflicting--effects on the directions and rates at which other traits evolve.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Insects in fluctuating thermal environments.

            All climate change scenarios predict an increase in both global temperature means and the magnitude of seasonal and diel temperature variation. The nonlinear relationship between temperature and biological processes means that fluctuating temperatures lead to physiological, life history, and ecological consequences for ectothermic insects that diverge from those predicted from constant temperatures. Fluctuating temperatures that remain within permissive temperature ranges generally improve performance. By contrast, those which extend to stressful temperatures may have either positive impacts, allowing repair of damage accrued during exposure to thermal extremes, or negative impacts from cumulative damage during successive exposures. We discuss the mechanisms underlying these differing effects. Fluctuating temperatures could be used to enhance or weaken insects in applied rearing programs, and any prediction of insect performance in the field-including models of climate change or population performance-must account for the effect of fluctuating temperatures.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              No pause in the increase of hot temperature extremes

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                chenghkm@126.com
                zxmalex@126.com
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                14 April 2020
                14 April 2020
                2020
                : 10
                : 6418
                Affiliations
                GRID grid.410696.c, College of Plant Protection, Yunnan Agricultural University, National Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Biological Resources in Yunnan, ; Kunming, 650201 China
                Article
                63502
                10.1038/s41598-020-63502-w
                7156735
                32286472
                9e5c03d5-5fcc-4fb5-be31-bd947d5e309e
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 15 November 2019
                : 31 March 2020
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Uncategorized
                plant sciences,zoology
                Uncategorized
                plant sciences, zoology

                Comments

                Comment on this article