Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Treatment for Word Retrieval in Semantic and Logopenic Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia: Immediate and Long-Term Outcomes

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 82

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          MRC psycholinguistic database: Machine-usable dictionary, version 2.00

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Abeta amyloid and glucose metabolism in three variants of primary progressive aphasia.

            Alzheimer's disease (AD) is found at autopsy in up to one third of patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), but clinical features that predict AD pathology in PPA are not well defined. We studied the relationships between language presentation, Abeta amyloidosis, and glucose metabolism in three PPA variants using [11C]-Pittsburgh compound B ([11C]PIB) and [18F]-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET). Patients meeting PPA criteria (N = 15) were classified as logopenic aphasia (LPA), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), or semantic dementia (SD) based on language testing. [11C]PIB distribution volume ratios were calculated using Logan graphical analysis (cerebellar reference). [18F]FDG images were normalized to pons. Partial volume correction was applied. Elevated cortical PIB (by visual inspection) was more common in LPA (4/4 patients) than in PNFA (1/6) and SD (1/5) (p < 0.02). In PIB-positive PPA, PIB uptake was diffuse and indistinguishable from the pattern in matched AD patients (n = 10). FDG patterns were focal and varied by PPA subtype, with left temporoparietal hypometabolism in LPA, left frontal hypometabolism in PNFA, and left anterior temporal hypometabolism in SD. FDG uptake was significant asymmetric (favoring left hypometabolism) in PPA (p < 0.005) but not in AD. LPA is associated with Abeta amyloidosis, suggesting that subclassification of PPA based on language features can help predict the likelihood of AD pathology. Language phenotype in PPA is closely related to metabolic changes that are focal and anatomically distinct between subtypes, but not to amyloid deposition patterns that are diffuse and similar to AD.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Evaluating single-subject treatment research: lessons learned from the aphasia literature.

              The mandate for evidence-based practice has prompted careful consideration of the weight of the scientific evidence regarding the therapeutic value of various clinical treatments. In the field of aphasia, a large number of single-subject research studies have been conducted, providing clinical outcome data that are potentially useful for clinicians and researchers; however, it has been difficult to discern the relative potency of these treatments in a standardized manner. In this paper we describe an approach to quantify treatment outcomes for single-subject research studies using effect sizes. These values provide a means to compare treatment outcomes within and between individuals, as well as to compare the relative strength of various treatments. Effect sizes also can be aggregated in order to conduct meta-analyses of specific treatment approaches. Consideration is given to optimizing research designs and providing adequate data so that the value of treatment research is maximized.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
                J Speech Lang Hear Res
                American Speech Language Hearing Association
                1092-4388
                1558-9102
                August 15 2019
                August 15 2019
                : 62
                : 8
                : 2723-2749
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin
                [2 ]Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco
                [3 ]Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Kentucky, Lexington
                [4 ]Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson
                Article
                10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-18-0144
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article