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      IGF1R Axis Inhibition Restores Dendritic Cell Antitumor Response in Ovarian Cancer

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          Abstract

          Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays a key role in regulating growth and invasiveness in several malignancies, including ovarian cancer. IGF1R targeting showed antiproliferative activity of EOC cells. However, clinical studies failed to show significant benefit. EOC cells suppress antitumor immune responses by inducing dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction. The IGF1 axis can regulate DC maturation.

          The current study evaluated involvement of the IGF1 axis in DC differentiation in EOC. Studies were conducted on EOC and on a human monocyte cell line. Tissue microarray analysis (TMA) was performed on 36 paraffin blocks from EOC patients. Expression of IGF1R, p53, Ki67, BRCA1, and DC markers was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Co-culture of EOC cells with DC pretreated with IGF1R inhibitor blocked cancer cell migration. TMA demonstrated higher rate of IGF1R protein expression in patients with advanced (76.9%) as compared to early (40%) EOC. A negative correlation between IGF1R protein expression and the CD1c marker was found. These findings provide evidence that IGF1R axis inhibition could be a therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer by restoring DC-mediated antitumor immunity.

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          Most cited references 54

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          Blockade of B7-H1 improves myeloid dendritic cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

          Suppression of dendritic cell function in cancer patients is thought to contribute to the inhibition of immune responses and disease progression. Molecular mechanisms of this suppression remain elusive, however. Here, we show that a fraction of blood monocyte-derived myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs) express B7-H1, a member of the B7 family, on the cell surface. B7-H1 could be further upregulated by tumor environmental factors. Consistent with this finding, virtually all MDCs isolated from the tissues or draining lymph nodes of ovarian carcinomas express B7-H1. Blockade of B7-H1 enhanced MDC-mediated T-cell activation and was accompanied by downregulation of T-cell interleukin (IL)-10 and upregulation of IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-gamma. T cells conditioned with the B7-H1-blocked MDCs had a more potent ability to inhibit autologous human ovarian carcinoma growth in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. Therefore, upregulation of B7-H1 on MDCs in the tumor microenvironment downregulates T-cell immunity. Blockade of B7-H1 represents one approach for cancer immunotherapy.
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            Insulin-like growth factors and neoplasia.

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              Ovarian cancer.

              Ovarian carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms and are traditionally subclassified based on type and degree of differentiation. Although current clinical management of ovarian carcinoma largely fails to take this heterogeneity into account, it is becoming evident that each major histological type has characteristic genetic defects that deregulate specific signaling pathways in the tumor cells. Moreover, within the most common histological types, the molecular pathogenesis of low-grade versus high-grade tumors appears to be largely distinct. Mouse models of ovarian carcinoma have been developed that recapitulate many of the morphological features, biological behavior, and gene-expression patterns of selected subtypes of ovarian cancer. Such models will likely prove useful for studying ovarian cancer biology and for preclinical testing of molecularly targeted therapeutics, which may ultimately lead to better clinical outcomes for women with ovarian cancer.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Transl Oncol
                Transl Oncol
                Translational Oncology
                Neoplasia Press
                1936-5233
                16 May 2020
                August 2020
                16 May 2020
                : 13
                : 8
                Affiliations
                [a ]Gynecology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Israel
                [b ]The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
                [c ]Institute of Pathology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel
                [d ]Gynecologic Oncology Division, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel
                Author notes
                [* ]Address all correspondence to: Lina Somri-Gannam, Gynecology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Israel. lina.gannam@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                S1936-5233(20)30094-2 100790
                10.1016/j.tranon.2020.100790
                7232112
                © 2020 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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