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      Severe atypical herpes zoster as an initial symptom of fatal myelodysplastic syndrome with refractory anemia and blast excess (RAEB II)

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          Abstract

          Herpes zoster is a common disease caused due to varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection with increasing incidence by age. If the patient has a severe, extended, or treatment-recalcitrant course of herpes zoster, this must be a red flag to search for underlying pathologies. Here, we report about a 64-year-old male patient with diabetes, who came to our emergency department because of general malaise, fever, chills, and a pronounced nuchal and facial swelling on the left side. Based on herpetiform-grouped vesicles and yellowish crusts, an impetiginized facial herpes zoster was diagnosed, and combined antiviral and antibiotic treatment was initiated. He was HIV negative. Despite intensified treatment, his situation worsened. We observed blasts in peripheral blood, but bone marrow biopsy was initially denied. Some days later after deterioration of his disease, he accepted further diagnostics. A myelodysplastic syndrome with blast excess (refractory anemia and blast excess II, RAEB II) could be confirmed. The following translocations were detected: t(2;12)(p13; q13) and t(6;9)(p22;q34). REAB II has an unfortunate prognosis. Cytoreductive treatment was initiated by the hematooncologist. Unfortunately, the patient deceased due to septic shock.

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          Most cited references 9

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          Community-acquired infections and their association with myeloid malignancies.

          Antigenic stimulation is a proposed aetiologic mechanism for many haematological malignancies. Limited evidence suggests that community-acquired infections may increase the risk of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, associations with other myeloid malignancies including chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are unknown.
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            The t(6;9)(p22;q34) in myeloid neoplasms: a retrospective study of 16 cases.

            Among patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the t(6;9) (p22;q34) is a rare but defined subset with a poor prognosis. We report 16 patients with the t(6;9), of whom 13 had AML, 2 had myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and 1 had chronic myeloid leukemia in myeloid blast crisis (CML-BC). All except for one were evaluated at diagnosis. The median age was 34.5 (range: 7-62 years), with 12 adults and 12 males. Trilineage dysplasia was present in 13 (81%). Marrow basophilia was seen in only two patients, one of whom had CML-BC. HLA-DR was positive in all 12 patients assessed, CD33 in 11, CD13 in 10, and CD34 in seven. Four patients had one other abnormality apart from the t(6;9). These were the t(9;22) in the patient with CML and deletion 9q, addition 13q, and an isochromosome 8q in the other three patients. There were no complex karyotypes. Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3--internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutations were seen in seven of 13 patients. Follow-up details were available for six patients. Three received palliative care, and follow-up details were not available for the other seven. The response to chemotherapy was poor in the remaining patients. The only patients who survived were three out of the four who had allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              European consensus-based (S2k) Guideline on the Management of Herpes Zoster - guided by the European Dermatology Forum (EDF) in cooperation with the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV), Part 1: Diagnosis.

              Herpes zoster (HZ, shingles) is a frequent medical condition which may severely impact the quality of life of affected patients. Different therapeutic approaches to treat acute HZ are available. The aim of this European project was the elaboration of a consensus-based guideline on the management of patients who present with HZ, considering different patient populations and different localizations. This interdisciplinary guideline aims at an improvement of the outcomes of the acute HZ management concerning disease duration, acute pain and quality of life of the affected patients and at a reduction of the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia and other complications. The guideline development followed a structured and predefined process, considering the quality criteria for guidelines development as suggested by the AGREE II instrument. The steering group was responsible for the planning and the organization of the guideline development process (Division of Evidence based Medicine, dEBM). The expert panel was nominated by virtue of clinical expertise and/or scientific experience and included experts from the fields of dermatology, virology/infectiology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology and anaesthesiology. Recommendations for clinical practice were formally consented during the consensus conference, explicitly considering different relevant aspects. The guideline was approved by the commissioning societies after an extensive internal and external review process. In this first part of the guideline, diagnostic means have been evaluated. The expert panel formally consented recommendations for the management of patients with (suspected) HZ, referring to the assessment of HZ patients, considering various specific clinical situations. Users of the guideline must carefully check whether the recommendations are appropriate for the context of intended application. In the setting of an international guideline, it is generally important to consider different national approaches and legal circumstances with regard to the regulatory approval, availability and reimbursement of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany
                [2 ]Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, Medical Institute of Ministry of Interior (MVR), Sofia, Bulgaria
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Uwe Wollina, Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Friedrichstrasse 41, 01067 Dresden, Germany, Email wollina-uw@ 123456khdf.de
                Journal
                Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol
                Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol
                Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry
                Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7015
                2017
                18 May 2017
                : 10
                : 195-198
                ccid-10-195
                10.2147/CCID.S133966
                5478159
                © 2017 Wollina et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Case Report

                Dermatology

                emergency, sepsis, myelodysplastic syndrome, varicella zoster virus, herpes zoster

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