175
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Taphonomic and ecologic information from bone weathering

      Paleobiology

      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Bones of recent mammals in the Amboseli Basin, southern Kenya, exhibit distinctive weathering characteristics that can be related to the time since death and to the local conditions of temperature, humidity and soil chemistry. A categorization of weathering characteristics into six stages, recognizable on descriptive criteria, provides a basis for investigation of weathering rates and processes. The time necessary to achieve each successive weathering stage has been calibrated using known-age carcasses. Most bones decompose beyond recognition in 10 to 15 yr. Bones of animals under 100 kg and juveniles appear to weather more rapidly than bones of large animals or adults. Small-scale rather than widespread environmental factors seem to have greatest influence on weathering characteristics and rates. Bone weathering is potentially valuable as evidence for the period of time represented in recent or fossil bone assemblages, including those on archeological sites, and may also be an important tool in censusing populations of animals in modern ecosystems.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Cyclical Changes in the Habitat and Climate of an East African Ecosystem

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Observed Formation and Burial of a Recent Human Occupation Site in Kenya

            A recent human campsite, occupied in 1973 by members of the Dassanetch tribe of northern Kenya, was observed from its creation through its subsequent burial in flood events 4 months later. The site was excavated as an archeological occurrence in the summer of 1974. Analyses of field and laboratory data yield a detailed picture of sedimentary structures, bone transport and burial, and site preservation in a well-documented depositional situation. Trampling by site occupants was apparently instrumental in burying much small bone prior to the flood events which acted on the site. About 30 cm of sediments accumulated on the site during four or five flood events. Individual sedimentary beds can be related to specific observed flood events in the drainage system. The ultimate preservation of the site as part of the region's archeological record would depend upon the interaction of sediment deflation and the varying local water table. Specific conditions which tend to preserve human sites in water-poor environments may consistently select seasonally biased vestiges of human settlement and economy.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Weathering Cracks and Split-Line Patterns in Archaeological Bone

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                applab
                Paleobiology
                Paleobiology
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                0094-8373
                1938-5331
                1978
                April 2016
                : 4
                : 02
                : 150-162
                Article
                10.1017/S0094837300005820
                © 1978

                Comments

                Comment on this article